Tag Archives | Swastika

The Process Church of the Final Judgment Lives On

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A church that, in theory, worships Jesus and Satan equally, was tied to Charles Manson, and has a symbol that looks more than a tad bit like a swastika is bound to get a little attention. And it did.

In 1963, Robert DeGrimston Moore and Mary Ann MacLean met at the L Ron Hubbard Institute of Scientology in England. The two were not the follower types and it wasn’t long before they created their own school of thought. At the beginning they were influenced by Alfred Adler, a Freudian who had broken away to develop his own ideas. Adler believed that people were driven by what he called ‘secret goals,’ hidden agendas that gave rise to compulsions and neuroses. The idea was to discover these goals and make them conscious. DeGrimston and MacLean created a new system called Compulsions Analysis.

Soon they had followers, some of whom had sizable bank accounts.… Read the rest

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Swastika Controversy in Germany: Are Any Symbols Beyond Redemption?

Via Raw Story: In what must be an extraordinary act of naivete (or likely extraordinary fatuousness), Russian singer Yevgeny Nikitin claims not to have known that his Swastika tattoo was in any way connected with the Nazi party or its Neo-Nazi brethren. The row over Nikitin's tattoos began when the singer was attached to star in a new production of Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" at Germany's Bayreuth music festival. Nikitin claims that the now-infamous symbol holds spiritual, not political, significance for him. Nonetheless, the uproar over Nikitin's swastika (along with his "Tyr" tattoos) forced him to withdraw from the prestigious festival. The swastika does indeed have an ancient history (most date it back 3,000 years to ancient India), and versions of it have popped up here and there throughout the world. In the present, the symbol means only one thing to most people: Naziism. It's hard to believe that any adult Westerner alive would be aware of the symbol's ancient mythological past, yet have its more recent controversial usage escape them...
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