Tag Archives | Taxation

Starbucks, Her Majesty’s Government And An Apocalypse

hand_grenade_war_military_bomb_army_marines_mug-r250b15dbdbaf42dd8d3d721fe95eded7_x7jgr_8byvr_512One meme in ’merry old England’ which requires swift disembowelment is the curious idea there’s a quasi-religious duty to pay Her Majesty’s Government with as much tax as possible. Starbucks came under fire recently for legally avoiding the UK’s excessive taxation system. In the face of massive pressure from Her Majesty’s obedient subjects, who duly protested once Her broadcaster the BBC made an issue of it, the company was forced to relent[1].

There’s a theory Roman Emperors who declared themselves Gods, or God-appointed, did not do so simply because they were arrogant but instead as a power grab aimed at the religious establishment. In practical terms it appears to have been a way of getting access to the huge booty sacrificed to ‘Gods’ after each harvest. Her Majesty’s Government has much in common with them. Those subjected to Her rule must sacrifice their time and money to a Monarch who also claims authority directly from a God[2]. Curiously though, in the so-called Modern world, loyal subjects will defend to their death her right to be Queen.… Read the rest

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Want Less Inequality? Tax It

Wikimedia Commons (CC)

British economist Arthur C. Pigou, friend and contemporary of beloved John Maynard Keynes, eventually not only came around to the Keynesian logic, but also expanded on the common-sense philosophy to promote social balance and checks with the gentle, invisible hand of the Public. By incentivizing what benefits the downtrodden (perhaps with subsidies) and disincentivizing poor practices (by taxing rampant, unregulated profits), a more reasonable parity between the classes could be reached, stimulating economic growth and benefiting everyone.

This doesn’t have to be a ‘redistributive’ scheme that pits neoconservatives against progressives. Indeed, such a rational, gradated, and bracketed system makes sense to anyone who believes in the American traditions of pragmatism, equality, openness, innovation and opportunity.

Via the American Prospect by Liam C. Malloy and John Case

But the conventional strategy for fighting inequality—far higher taxes on the rich—usually rests on a foundation of fairness, and the question of what’s fair and what’s unfair turns out to cut different ways, depending on your point of view.

Read the rest

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Tax Protester Tom Cryer: Gone But Not Forgotten

Via Wikipedia and TruthAttack.org:

Tom Cryer was an attorney in Shreveport, Louisiana who was charged with and later acquitted of willful failure to file U.S. federal income tax returns in a timely fashion. In a recent case in United States Tax Court, Cryer contested a determination by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service that he owed $1.7 million in taxes and penalties. Before the case could come to trial, Cryer died June 4, 2012. He was 62:

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Who Creates Jobs (and Other Critical Questions)

Help WantedTom Matlack writes on The Good Men Project:

The web is abuzz with TED’s decision not to let a former Amazon.com investor make his case for middle-class job creation. Meanwhile Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg gets ready to watch his $20 or so billion become liquid when his company opens trading this morning. The French and Greeks have elected liberal leaders who campaigned against austerity as the answer to the Euro debt crisis. And here in the United States the general election is kicking into high gear with the Romney campaign releasing this ad yesterday in key swing states.

Let’s try to get a few things straight here before resorting to mud slinging.

1) Any way you slice it we have a debt problem threatening to kill us.

Government spending here in the United States and across much of the developed world is completely out of control. As of March 2012, debt held by the public was $10.85 trillion or approximately 70% GDP, while the intragovernmental debt was $4.74 trillion or approximately 30% GDP.… Read the rest

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Stephen King: Tax Me, For Fuck’s Sake!

Stephen King, ComiconStephen King is so rich and so famous that he can say whatever he likes and it won’t matter a bit to him or his readers … so he does, in the Daily Beast:

Chris Christie may be fat, but he ain’t Santa Claus. In fact, he seems unable to decide if he is New Jersey’s governor or its caporegime, and it may be a comment on the coarsening of American discourse that his brash rudeness is often taken for charm. In February, while discussing New Jersey’s newly amended income-tax law, which allows the rich to pay less (proportionally) than the middle class, Christie was asked about Warren Buffett’s observation that he paid less federal income taxes than his personal secretary, and that wasn’t fair. “He should just write a check and shut up,” Christie responded, with his typical verve. “I’m tired of hearing about it. If he wants to give the government more money, he’s got the ability to write a check—go ahead and write it.”

Heard it all before.

Read the rest

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Better Late Than Never! Tax-Day Tips for Tax Protesters

Uncle SamEAGER, ARIZ.— This tax day, the legacy of tax protesters still lives strong. And perhaps among the most famous Americans in their number was Bill Cooper, who now resides in a cemetery just off of 356 South Papago Street in Springerville, Ariz. Hanging in the area near Mr. Cooper is not much that Google Maps seems to want to comment on — a baseball diamond, a fenced in area to take a stroll — no webcam footage.

All that looks available of the area is a single Flickr user with geotracking on a digital single-lens reflex camera. That there is tax-dodging country.

Here’s The Internet Chronicle’s guide to fearing the IRS, who is like Seal Team 6, but more omniscient.

  1. The heat will probably be really hyped up, even if you’re just really just a self-sufficient survivalist. You’re no more in the “militia” than Zimmerman is a “neighborhood watch enthusiast” like the liberal media down at Raw Story said he was.
  2. Read the rest

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So How Many Americans Actually Pay No Taxes?

Informative article from NPR’s “All Things Considered”:

It’s that time of year again — tax week. With the deadline for Americans to file their income taxes looming, there’s a good chance you’ve heard or will hear from politicians, on cable news and on talk radio about those who pay little or no taxes.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has said that we “have a situation in this country where you’re nearing 50 percent of people who don’t even pay income taxes.” There are even those who say that there are nearly 50 percent of Americans who pay no taxes at all.

While it is true that about half of American households pay no federal income tax, the odds that half of Americans are paying no taxes at all are relatively low. Sales taxes, payroll taxes and state taxes make it difficult to avoid paying all taxes completely.

But is it possible?

Read the rest

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It’s Tax Time: Time to Occupy the IRS

IRSEvery year I trek down to a nondescript office building near Wall Street with a bag full of receipts and a belly full of anxiety.

When it’s tax time, I always hope for the best but … I also had an accountant who I trusted to keep me on the up and up. He was recommended years earlier by the Yippie activist Abbie Hoffman, who wanted to avoid the Al Capone problem.

Abbie had been busted enough for his political activities and didn’t want more jail time for non-payment of taxes. So he had to be like the driven snow to withstand any audit. And he was. He was a revolutionary who held his nose and paid the man.

Back in the day, the government used IRS investigations to threaten political activists and intimidate activists that paid their taxes as opposed to those who became tax resisters to refuse to pay for wars.… Read the rest

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A War Tax at the Gas Pump?

Gas PumpInteresting point of view from Jeff Klein on Counterpunch:

It’s hard to miss the higher cost of gas every time we fill up our cars these days, but the News Media doesn’t do a very good job of explaining why. There isn’t any mystery, though, if you read the financial press and oil industry sources: We’re paying extra for gas because of rising tensions in the Middle East and especially the scare over a possible US or Israeli attack on Iran. In effect, we’re paying a “war tax” at the gas pump, and the cost will only get higher unless we put aside the talk of war and get down to serious diplomacy to settle the differences in the region.

Here’s what the Wall Street Journal had to say recently, under the headline “Oil Rise Imperils Budding Recovery”:

Rising oil prices are emerging once again as a threat to the U.S.

Read the rest

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