Tag Archives | Terrorism

The Charlie Hebdo Cartoon Covers

By now everyone is aware of the Paris assassinations of the Charlie Hebdo journalists. We feel sure that Charb and his team would want their work to go far and wide in response to the acts of the murderous Islamists who carried out France’s worst terrorist incident since the 1960s, so here are a couple of the cartoon covers that, in the eyes of some, required the death of the people who created them:

charlie hebdo

For those interested in supporting what’s left of Charlie Hebdo, its lawyer, Richard Malka, has confirmed that next week’s edition of the magazine will be published on Wednesday and will have a print run of one million, instead of the normal 60,000 copies.

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Twelve Murders at Paris Offices of Satirical Magazine Charlie Hebdo

charlie

This is a breaking story so expect news to change throughout the day. Needless to say, everyone at disinformation believes in free speech and freedom of the press, so this terrorist attack on a controversial publisher is horrific to all of us and we massively sympathize with everyone at Charlie Hebdo and their families.

Here’s a link to The Guardian‘s “What We Know So Far” article. :

 Two gunmen entered the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and opened fire. Witnesses reported seeing hooded men shouting “Allahu Akbar” carrying pump-action Kalashnikovs going into the magazine’s offices and then hearing heavy gunfire. Police said three attackers were involved, including one who drove a car to the scene.

So far, 12 people have been confirmed dead – 10 Charlie Hebdo staff and two police officers. Video footage showed one of the officers being shot at close range as he lay injured on the street.

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Pakistan school attack: years of inaction on terror threat led to this atrocity

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Talat Farooq, University of Birmingham

The shock waves from a brutal terror attack that claimed the lives of more than 130 children in the northern Pakistani city of Peshawar are being felt around the world.

The Taliban assault, which began on Tuesday morning, has claimed the lives of at least 141 people. Across social media people expressed their horror and sympathy. From Pakistan to the UK, relatives of children attending the Army Public School were anxiously awaiting news.

The attack is being seen as one of the worst in nearly a decade of unabated violence in the country that has killed more than 55,000 Pakistanis – most of whom were civilians.

The Pakistani Taliban, or Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, has confirmed that it was responsible for the attack and said the school was hit in response to army operations that have been taking place in the tribal areas.… Read the rest

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UK to stop its citizens seeing extremist material online

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Israel Defense Forces (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via Gigaom:

The U.K.’s big internet service providers, including BT, Talk Talk, Virgin Media and Sky, have agreed to filter out terrorist and extremist material at the government’s behest, in order to stop people seeing things that may make them sympathetic towards terrorists.

The move will also see providers host a public reporting button for terrorist material. This is likely to be similar to what is already done with websites that may host child pornography – people can report content to the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), an organization that maintains a blacklist, to which that site could then be added.

In the case of extremist material, though, it appears that the reports would go through to the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit (CTIRU), which is based in London’s Metropolitan Police and has already been very active in identifying extremist material and having it taken down.

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After 13 years, 2 wars and trillions in military spending, terrorist attacks are rising sharply

Surprise! Wonkblog shows the stats on what we all knew anyway: American military intervention only causes more terrorism:

Last year saw the highest number of terrorist incidents since 2000, according to the latest Global Terrorism Index released by the Institute for Economics and Peace. Worldwide, the number of terrorist incidents increased from less than 1,500 in 2000 to nearly 10,000 in 2013. Sixty percent of attacks last year occurred in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nigeria and Syria.

The report suggests that U.S. foreign policy has played a big role in making the problem worse: “The rise in terrorist activity coincided with the US invasion of Iraq,” it concludes. “This created large power vacuums in the country allowing different factions to surface and become violent.” Indeed, among the five countries accounting for the bulk of attacks, the U.S. has prosecuted lengthy ground wars in two (Iraq and Afghanistan), a drone campaign in one (Pakistan), and airstrikes in a fourth (Syria).

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Hitler’s Legacy: The Skorzeny Syndrome

Bundesarchiv Bild 101III-Alber-183-25, Otto Skorzeny.jpg

Otto Skorzeny

“Terrorism, the Skorzeny Syndrome, is flourishing in the modern world, a reminder that Hitler and Nazism are still taking their toll more than three decades after the Third Reich collapsed.”—Glenn B. Infield115

The above quotation is from Infield’s biography of Otto Skorzeny, published in 1981, and the facts are as true today as they were then. Infield writes of the relationship that existed between Skorzeny and Yassir Arafat, for instance, and reminds us how Skorzeny advised the PLO and Al-Fatah from his base in Cairo. Infield knew and interviewed Skorzeny, and his biography of “Hitler’s Commando” is relevant to any contemporary study of the origins of modern terrorism.

What the world has been experiencing since at least 2001 and certainly for years earlier than the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon has been what analysts refer to as “asymmetrical warfare” conducted by “non-state actors.” This is a technique that was developed to perfection by Skorzeny and the other leaders of what we have called ODESSA.… Read the rest

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[Cartoon] First Dog on the Moon on … Isis’s letter to the west

This comic originally appeared on The Guardian, it was republished with permission.

 

firstdog isisView larger picture

To read more cartoons, check out the website.
Visit the First Dog on the Moon shop: “First Shop on the Moon.”
Follow First Dog on the Moon on Twitter.
Like First Dog on the Moon on Facebook.

 

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Fear Incorporated: Terrorism as Thorazine

Compared to nearly a decade and a half of war, extrajudicial killing, and occupations, we know that conventional intelligence and police work has been extraordinarily effective at preventing terrorist attacks here in the US, and it has done so at a relatively low cost. (Image: Stock / Public domain)

Compared to nearly a decade and a half of war, extrajudicial killing, and occupations, we know that conventional intelligence and police work has been extraordinarily effective at preventing terrorist attacks here in the US, and it has done so at a relatively low cost. (Image: Stock / Public domain)

John Atcheson writes at Common Dreams:

In 2003 we invaded Iraq with no real reason being offered.  Hundreds of thousands protested.

We’re in the process of doing it again, and again, no credible reasons are being offered, but no one is taking to the streets.  We are as amiable sheep, heading to slaughter.

Back in 2003, Bush, Cheney and the neocons said it was part of the “war on terror.”  But there was no link between al Qaeda and Iraq; were no WMDs; and the strategy of “fighten’ over there so’s we wouldn’t have to fight them here” never made a lick of sense.  The strategy of invade and occupy is costing us $4.4 trillion, resulting in 6,617 US troop deaths and counting, millions of civilian casualties, and causing an exponential increase in the number of terrorists.

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Terrorists can be defeated by fighting fear with cooperation

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Robert Imre, University of Newcastle

From anarchists in the 1920s and radical leftists in the 1960s, to fringe, extreme-right Christian bombers or gunmen in the United States in recent decades, or radical Islamists such as Islamic State today, terrorist groups have one thing in common. They seek to shock, while simultaneously portraying themselves as victims. While their beliefs can vary wildly, what they all share is the “propaganda of the deed” in their extreme violent activities.

Typically, political violence in the most extreme form – terrorism – usually will see groups fracture in to smaller sub-groups. Once violence is legitimated, it then becomes a way to settle internal disagreements as well.

Given that we have seen a number of terrorist groups come and go over the decades, it bears scrutiny how these various groups were successfully stopped, as well as where governments failed.… Read the rest

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Islamic State wants Australians to attack Muslims: terror expert

 

Police outside one of the Sydney homes raided earlier today, which has prompted warnings against an anti-Muslim backlash. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Police outside one of the Sydney homes raided earlier today, which has prompted warnings against an anti-Muslim backlash. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Nick O’Brien
Former head of International Counter Terrorism in Special Branch at New Scotland Yard; Associate Professor Counter Terrorism at Charles Sturt University

It’s in the interests of Islamic State for Muslims in Australia to be attacked or for their mosques to be attacked, because doing so would help divide the Australian community. But we should be very clear: the only people who win if Australia is divided are the extremists.

The new allegations of a plot to kidnap and behead Australians as a way of supporting the Islamic State didn’t surprise me, because there was a similar plot in the UK about seven years ago. In that UK case, it was a plot to kidnap, torture and behead a British Muslim soldier, film it, and put it on the internet.… Read the rest

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