Tag Archives | Nikola Tesla

Tesla’s Dream Of Wireless Transmission Of Electricity Realized In Japan

Nikola Tesla’s dream realized? Phys.org says it’s happening in Japan:

Japanese scientists have succeeded in transmitting energy wirelessly, in a key step that could one day make solar power generation in space a possibility, an official said Thursday.

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“Tesla coil (discharge).” by Daniel Grohmann (CC)

Researchers used microwaves to deliver 1.8 kilowatts of power—enough to run an electric kettle—through the air with pinpoint accuracy to a receiver 55 metres (170 feet) away.

While the distance was not huge, the technology could pave the way for mankind to eventually tap the vast amount of  available in space and use it here on Earth, a spokesman for The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said.

“This was the first time anyone has managed to send a high output of nearly two kilowatts of  via microwaves to a small target, using a delicate directivity control device,” he said.

JAXA has been working on devising Space Solar Power Systems for years, the spokesman said.

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Drone Captures Video of Soviet-era ‘Tesla Tower’ Lightning Machine

So why is it that the Russians are testing Nikola Tesla’s amazing inventions while all we can do in the United States is make a fictional movie about them (The Prestige)? RT has some pretty cool video footage:

Normally hidden from prying eyes in the Moscow region’s forests, the mysterious ‘Tesla Tower’ has been captured from above by an RT Ruptly drone. The research site is home to a massive impulse generator, one of the most powerful in the world.

RT’s Ruptly was allowed to take exclusive drone footage of the Marx generator, better known as the ‘Tesla Tower,’ constructed back in the 1970s by the Russian Electrical Engineering Institute. The aim of the Soviet project was to have a machine to test insulation and the effects of lightning on aircraft. It was also intended to be used in the study of the weaponization of electro-magnetic pulses (EMP), as well as the effects of a nuclear or solar blast on vehicles and electronics.

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Nikola Tesla Meets Orson Welles

Tesla

While David Bowie’s portrayal of Nikola Tesla in The Prestige is still my favorite on-screen depiction of the famous mad scientist, this 1980 production from Yugoslavia is an ambitious attempt at bringing Tesla’s tale to the cinema, and Orson Welles’ turn as J.P. Morgan is worth the price of admission. Here’s the Wiki…

The Secret of Nikola Tesla (Serbo-Croatian: ‘Tajna Nikole Tesle’), is a 1980 Yugoslav biographical film which details events in the life of the discoverer Nikola Tesla (portrayed by Serbian actor Petar Božović). Tesla was born to ethnic Serb parents in 1856 Croatia (at the time, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire). He arrived in New York in 1884, became an American citizen in 1891, made immense contributions to science and died in Manhattan at age 86 during World War II in 1943.[1]

This biography includes references to his amazing abilities of detailed mental visualization as well as the slowly intensifying personal habits, indulgences or eccentricities for which he became nearly as well known.Read the rest

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Nikola Tesla: Men’s Rights Hero

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Nikola Tesla has been hailed as many things, inventor, genius, etc., but as a hero of so-called “men’s rights” activists? Apparently so, reports PaleoFuture:

Nikola Tesla is celebrated as a genius who had an amazing ability to envision the future. He predicted cellphones, television, and even elements of the internet long before any of these things existed. But he also had some weird ideas about the social issues of tomorrow. Which is why he’s become an unlikely hero in the so-called Men’s Rights community of today.

Despite his brilliance with all things technological, Tesla’s views on the social structure of the future were sometimes rather unfortunate. He advocated for the principles of eugenics and forced sterilization to ensure that only humans with the most desirable traits could reproduce. And he insisted that men would one day be forced to submit to women.

The inventor imagined a society structured like that of the bee — where male grunts do the heavy lifting and are otherwise only used for breeding purposes.

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Google’s CEO Larry Page on Improving the World, NSA, Security, and Tesla

via chycho

The following TED Talks interview with Google CEO Larry Page will either give you a warm fuzzy feeling all over, or turn your stomach making you feel nauseous to the point where you want to projectile vomit all over your screen.

Larry Page: Where’s Google going next?

I. Larry Page on Improving the World

Now don’t get me wrong, Google has done some good, but why are we expected to dismiss the bad? For example, when Larry Page so valiantly smiles and states that:

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Glenn Beck Developing ‘Edison vs. Tesla’ Movie

Nikola TeslaThe story of Thomas Edison taking all the glory while creative genius Nikola Tesla died alone and in poverty in the New Yorker Hotel room that was his final home certainly seems like a great premise for a movie, but can Glenn Beck be trusted to do it justice? Gizmodo gushes excitedly at the prospect:

Former Fox News TV personality Glenn Beck is really sick of talking about politics. So what rustles his jimmies these days? The mythologized feud between Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Beck even has a movie in production about Edison that he hopes will “expose the truth” about this “bad man.”

From National Review:

Another film will “expose the truth” about Thomas Edison, a villain Beck thinks has gotten a break from historians and whose real story demonstrates our flawed understanding of the 20th century. Though remembered as “this nice, kind of, good old Thomas,” Beck explains, “he was really a bad man who was electrocuting animals.” Edison,”was absolutely on the wrong end, and luckily for him the story ended happily with his name being taken off his own company and given to GE,” he says.

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Nikola Tesla’s Mechanical Men

Tesla boatIt’s mooted by Jon Turi at Engadget that Nikola Tesla, as ever ahead of his time, designed the first military drone, although he’s quoted as saying himself, “You do not see there a wireless torpedo; you see there the first of a race of robots, mechanical men which will do the laborious work of the human race”:

…Tesla once said, “The world moves slowly, and new truths are difficult to see.” It was his way of responding to the crowd’s stunned disbelief upon viewing his scientific wizardry at New York’s Madison Square Garden in 1898. Using a small, radio-transmitting control box, he was able to maneuver a tiny ship about a pool of water and even flash its running lights on and off, all without any visible connection between the boat and controller. Indeed few people at the time were aware that radio waves even existed and Tesla, an inventor often known to electrify the crowd with his creations, was pushing the boundaries yet again, with his remote-controlled vessel.

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Tunguska Meteorite Fragments Discovered

tunguska-photoOn June 30, 1908, something exploded over an isolated region of Siberia. Theories abound over what that something could have been, with explanations both prosaic (meteorite or comet) and preposterous (UFO crash, one of Tesla’s experiments gone wrong) offered over the years since that mysterious event. While I personally love the idea of a UFO crash, it turns out that scientists working with the Russian Academy of Science may have turned up the first solid proof that a meteorite may have been the actual culprit:

Via Technology Review:

In the 1930s, an expedition to the region led by the Russian mineralogist Leonid Kulik returned with a sample of melted glassy rock containing bubbles. Kulik considered this evidence of an impact event. But the sample was somehow lost and has never undergone modern analysis. As such, there is no current evidence of an impact in the form of meteorites.

That changes today with the extraordinary announcement by Andrei Zlobin from the Russian Academy of Sciences that he has found three rocks from the Tunguska region with the telltale characteristics of meteorites.

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Nikola Tesla’s Predictions For The 21st Century

teslaVia the Paleofuture blog on a 1935 interview with Liberty magazine in which Tesla revealed his intriguing imagining of the 21st century. He seemingly anticipated much of the dynamic betweens humans and technology to come, although his recommended diet of exclusively milk and honey has not come in vogue:

The creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was still 35 years away, but Tesla predicted a similar agency’s creation within a hundred years: “Hygiene, physical culture will be recognized branches of education and government. Our water supply will be far more carefully supervised, and only a lunatic will drink unsterilized water.”

Tesla’s work in robotics began in the late 1890s: “The solution of our problems does not lie in destroying but in mastering the machine. Innumerable activities still performed by human hands today will be performed by automatons. At this very moment scientists working in the laboratories of American universities are attempting to create what has been described as a ‘thinking machine.’ In the twenty-first century the robot will take the place which slave labor occupied in ancient civilization.”

Toward the end of Tesla’s life he had developed strange theories about the optimal human diet.

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