Tag Archives | Nikola Tesla

Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura- Season Three, Episode #2: Death Ray

In Episode #2 of Season Three of “Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura,” Jesse and the crew investigate another one of the more enduring conspiracy theories of the last 25 years:  the so-called “Death Ray” conspiracy. 

This theory alleges that the U.S. government, and now possibly other governments around the world, as well, has developed a super weapon that is capable of destruction ranging from individual assassinations to the nearly instantaneous demolition of buildings and cities. 

Different theorists trace the origin of this “Death Ray” weapon to different sources, but Jesse and the crew focus in on the theory that ascribes the development of the Death Ray to 1980’s era “Star Wars” research.  President Ronald Reagan, at the height of the Cold War, instituted a program called “Star Wars”, which sought to create a weapon defense system capable of intercepting and destroying missile attacks from foreign enemies, such as the former Soviet Union.  However, according to conventional history, the program was abandoned due to prohibitive costs and the system was never completed. 

Jesse and the crew point to the work of physicist Nikola Tesla as the original source for the scientific discoveries that were later used in the Star Wars program, which then led to the development of Death Ray technology.  Tesla, a common figured cited in many technologically-related conspiracy theories, died in 1943 while living in the States, and according to historical documents, after his death the research he left behind was confiscated by the FBI.… Read the rest

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Nikola Tesla, Hacker Hero

Nikola Tesla's Wardenclyffe lab building, seen in 1904.

Kelly Faircloth explains why inventor extraordinaire Nikola Tesla has become an icon for the new generation of hackers, for the New York Observer:

For all the modern-day desire to emulate Steve Jobs, the heroic nerd isn’t a new American trope. As long ago as the Gilded Age, scientist Nikola Tesla was a celebrity. He lived at the Waldorf Astoria and was close friends with Mark Twain.

But he was neither entertainer nor robber baron. Rather, as the inventor of an effective alternating current system of power generation, he’d helped usher in a new, electrified era. His ambitious visions of the future (and complete lack of a filter) made great copy, meaning newspaper reporters were always eager to put him in print.

In 1901, at the height of his fame, Tesla built a laboratory in the rural farmland of Shoreham, Long Island. Dubbed Wardenclyffe, the facility was designed by Stanford White and meant to be the site of his greatest achievement yet: Intercontinental transmission of wireless radio signals.

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Let’s Build A Goddamn Tesla Museum

Disinfonauts, start up your Tesla coils and join the campaign to create a Nikola Tesla museum at Wardenclyffe, Long Island, NY (details at The Oatmeal and crowdfunding via Indiegogo):

Nikola Tesla was the father of the electric age. Despite having drop-kicked humanity into a second industrial revolution, up until recently he’s been an unsung hero in history books. If you don’t know who Tesla is, go read this.

Tesla’s final laboratory is located in the sleepy town of Shoreham, New York. It’s known as Wardenclyffe and it’s where Tesla attempted to build a tower that would provide free wireless energy to the entire earth. Unfortunately, Tesla lost his funding before the project was completed and in 1917 the Wardenclyffe tower was demolished. Subsequently, the land was sold to a film and paper manufacturer.

However, the land, laboratory, and foundation beneath the tower are still there and very recently went up for sale.

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Nikola Tesla: Man Out Of Time

[disinfo ed.’s note: Nikola Tesla was born 156 years ago today. To mark the occasion, we’re republishing a disinformation original essay by Katy Schiel, originally posted on July 1, 2002.]

Revered as a genius by contemporary press and public, but largely forgotten at the beginning of the Twenty-first century, Serbian-American inventor Nikola Tesla today demands recognition as one of the greatest masterminds of the technological century.

Born during a particularly violent electrical storm in 1856, Tesla became a fierce genius touched by a deeply poetic sensibility. At his zenith, he counted among his many friends and supporters Mark Twain, John Jacob Astor, JP Morgan, and George Westinghouse. Yet when he died in 1943, he was destitute and in the company of only his pet pigeons.

Tesla foresaw the power of the new electric medium in the coming century better than anyone of his era. By the early 1900s, Tesla had received patents on over one hundred of his inventions and developed countless more after it became financially impossible for him to continue the patenting process.… Read the rest

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Nikola Tesla Graphic Novel May Lead To Game, Movie, Apps & More

Tesla InventorNikola Tesla’s amazing life’s work has long been a source of controversy as this brilliant inventor was shunned by the establishment and left to die alone in penury at The New Yorker Hotel (as an aside, at the legendary disinfocon in 2000, artist Paul Laffoley held a seance in Tesla’s old room at the hotel). Now Ravé Mehta is releasing a graphic novel about Tesla with plans for far more, reported by Dean Takahashi for VentureBeat:

The first project is a graphic novel-like non-fiction story, a 150-page comic book called The Inventor, about the life of late 19th-century scientist Nikola Tesla. If The Inventor takes off, it could become a game world, an app, and possibly a movie; in effect, it could become a “transmedia” entertainment property.

“We are testing the concept to see if it will catch on, and then we will take it across multiple platforms,” Mehta said.

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UFO’s Are Tesla’s Flying Saucers

Tesla

Nikola Tesla

Christian Soderberg writing for henrymakow.com:

The Daily Mail recently reported about “flying saucer”projects in Nazi Germany and Hitler’s plans to use these “wonder weapons” to attack England and USA.

The article talks only about jet-propulsion “saucers”, but the Germans were also building real ‘anti-gravity’ saucers based on inventions of Nikola Tesla (1856-1943).

UFOs or “flying saucers” are man-made, not “alien space ships”

Following the wave of “UFO” sightings in early 1950’s, Professor Giuseppe Belluzzo (1875-1952), a scientist-engineer and a former Italian cabinet minister, who apparently personally worked in one of these German-Italian “flying saucer” projects in the 1940’s, was quoted in Italian and American newspapers saying:

“There is nothing supernatural or Martian about flying discs, but they are simply rational application of recent technique. ..some great power is now launching discs to study them.”

You can read more about Professor Belluzzo’s saucer project here and here.

Nikola Tesla’s “flying stove”

…’You should not be at all surprised, if some day you see me fly from New York to Colorado Springs in a contrivance which will resemble a gas stove and weigh as much.

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Nikola Tesla – Mad Electricity

“When wireless is perfectly applied the whole earth will be converted into a huge brain, which in fact it is, all things being particles of a real and rhythmic whole. We shall be able to communicate with one another instantly, irrespective of distance. Not only this, but through television and telephony we shall see and hear one another as perfectly as though we were face to face, despite intervening distances of thousands of miles; and the instruments through which we shall be able to do his will be amazingly simple compared with our present telephone. A man will be able to carry one in his vest pocket.” - Nikola Tesla, 1929
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Long-Dead Inventor Nikola Tesla Is Electrifying Hip Techies

Nikola TeslaDaniel Michaels reports on some long overdue mainstream recognition of the genius of Nikola Tesla, for the Wall Street Journal:

Decades after he died penniless, Nikola Tesla is elbowing aside his old adversary Thomas Edison in the pantheon of geek gods.

When California engineers wanted to brand their new $100,000 electric sports car, one name stood out: Tesla. When circuit designers at microchip producer Nvidia Corp. in 2007 launched a new line of advanced processors, they called them Tesla. And when videogame writers at Capcom Entertainment in Silicon Valley needed a character who could understand alien spaceships for their new Dark Void saga, they found him in Nikola Tesla.

Tesla was a scientist and inventor who achieved fame and fortune in the 1880s for figuring out how to make alternating current work on a grand scale, electrifying the world. He created the first major hydroelectric dam, at Niagara Falls. He thrilled packed theaters with presentations in which he ran high voltage through his body to illuminate a fluorescent light in his hand.

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