Tag Archives | the holy grail

Sangreal, The Holy Grail: Recovering the Cosmic Science of Antiquity – Part 2.

“Hear ye the history of the most holy vessel that is called the Grail,
in which the precious blood of Jesus was received
on the day that He was put on the Cross.”
Perlesvaus: Anonymous
– Early 13th Century

Last month, in the article Sangreal, The  Holy Grail: Recovering the Cosmic Science of Antiquity – Part 1  I wrote,

“That the Grail has a cosmic dimension of meaning is indicated unequivocally by the texts themselves,” and also “. . . ancient adepts had a highly sophisticated concept of Exobiology and the Grail as a symbol was a repository of this knowledge.”

I also listed some of the varied symbols and meanings that have been associated with the Grail through the centuries.… Read the rest

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Sangreal, The Holy Grail: Recovering the Cosmic Science of Antiquity – Part 1

Sangreal2

Here is the book of thy descent,
Here is the book of the Sangreal,
Here begin the terrors,
Here begin the miracles

The History of the Grail – 12th Century, Anonymous

In last month’s article, after a discussion regarding dragons and other symbols employed by ancient peoples to represent celestial objects, I wrote: “Literacy in this language of cosmic symbolism opens up a whole new domain of understanding about our human past on this planet . . .” In that article and in the two preceding I discussed close encounters between these celestial objects and Earth, emphasizing the destructive potential inherent in such occurrences. While there is a great deal more that could, and should be said about the role of cosmically triggered catastrophes throughout both planetary and human history, in this article I will call attention to the other side of the equation, and hopefully, in the process, shed some light upon one of the most enigmatic and powerful of all esoteric symbols—the Holy Grail.… Read the rest

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Randall Carlson on The Meaning of Sacred Geometry

The Meaning of Sacred Geometry
by Randall Carlson

Most of us tend to think of geometry as a relatively dry, if not altogether boring, subject remembered from our Middle school years, consisting of endless axioms, definitions, postulates and proofs, hearkening back, in fact, to the methodology of Euclids Elements, in form and structure a masterly exposition of logical thinking and mental training but not the most thrilling read one might undertake in their leisure time. While the modern, academic approach to the study of geometry sees it as the very embodiment of rationalism and left brain, intellectual processes, which indeed it is, it has neglected the right brain, intuitive, artistic dimension of the subject. Sacred geometry seeks to unite and synthesize these two dynamic and complementary aspects of geometry into an integrated whole. Robert Lawlor addresses this fundamentally dualistic nature of geometry in his essential work: Sacred Geometry – Philosophy and Practice (1982), in reference to a medieval representation of geometry as a woman seated at a table, with compasses in hand, surrounded by the implements of the art:

 

“Geometry as a contemplative practice is personified by an elegant and refined woman, for geometry functions as an intuitive, synthesizing, creative yet exact activity of mind associated with the feminine principle.Read the rest

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