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The Meaning of Sacred Geometry part 3. The Womb of Geometry

The Meaning of Sacred Geometry part 3. The Womb of Sacred Geometry

by Randall Carlson

 

Christ_Seated_In_Glory

Christ seated within the Vesica Piscis (Glory)

 


*This is the 3rd part of the Meaning of Sacred Geometry series.  Access the previous articles at the following links.


As described in depth in ‘What’s the Point’ the second article, or lesson, in this series on the meaning of Sacred Geometry, it was explained that the entire process of Sacred Geometry begins with a mere point. From that initial point either a straight line or a circle may be generated. This initial generating point was likened to a seed. It was proposed that this was the basis for the New Testament parable of the Grain of Mustard Seed, an analog for the mass singularity in which the potential of the entire universe of Space and Time was contained at the first moment of Creation.… Read the rest

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Randall Carlson on The Meaning of Sacred Geometry

The Meaning of Sacred Geometry
by Randall Carlson

Most of us tend to think of geometry as a relatively dry, if not altogether boring, subject remembered from our Middle school years, consisting of endless axioms, definitions, postulates and proofs, hearkening back, in fact, to the methodology of Euclids Elements, in form and structure a masterly exposition of logical thinking and mental training but not the most thrilling read one might undertake in their leisure time. While the modern, academic approach to the study of geometry sees it as the very embodiment of rationalism and left brain, intellectual processes, which indeed it is, it has neglected the right brain, intuitive, artistic dimension of the subject. Sacred geometry seeks to unite and synthesize these two dynamic and complementary aspects of geometry into an integrated whole. Robert Lawlor addresses this fundamentally dualistic nature of geometry in his essential work: Sacred Geometry – Philosophy and Practice (1982), in reference to a medieval representation of geometry as a woman seated at a table, with compasses in hand, surrounded by the implements of the art:

 

“Geometry as a contemplative practice is personified by an elegant and refined woman, for geometry functions as an intuitive, synthesizing, creative yet exact activity of mind associated with the feminine principle.Read the rest

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