Tag Archives | the occult

Midday Veil’s Deliciously Witchy New Video (with Interview and Tour Details)

Yep, one the cooler things I've ever seen, and hey, I just interviewed Emily Pothast and Steven Miller who are the freakish brainchildren behind the whole thing: Thad: I found the concept particularly fascinating, because one of the themes that has been interpenetrating my psychic life as of late has been that of female energy consuming and feeding off the masculine — as if the previous era of humanity has shifted and now it’s time for the sacred feminine to devour the dark war mongering energy that “mankind” has created. Terence Mckenna, Whitley Strieber, and others have described encountering entities that have an almost insectile-multi-eyed-telepathic-hive-mind characteristics. I don’t know if you’re up on insect sexuality, but the feminine typically reigns supreme in that micro-verse. There are no King Bees, if you catch my drift. Thoughts? EP: Oh wow. Well, I mentioned the inspiration of mystery religions, myths that explore the inner workings of sex and death, which definitely relate to the core processes of nature. These myths are at the root of Christianity, but while the basic mechanism of the dying/resurrecting godman is alive and well in the character of Christ, the “feminine” and erotic aspects of the eternal that were also present in early versions of the myth have been considered taboo for most of Western history.
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Why Do So Many Christians Think Satan is Such a Pussy?

Your consciousness is always going to be a reflection your own informational intake, and it was probably reading pieces on Disinfo last week regarding shit like the practical applications of witch hunts, satanic child sex abuse conspiracies, and listening to Gabriel D. Roberts talk about his uber demento-Christian upbringing that got me thinking about a topic I’ve been meaning to write about for quite some time now. Namely, why do so many Christians, who spend a large portion of their lives supposedly battling Satan, seem to think he’s the biggest panty-waste imaginable?

One of the most absolutely unexpected things that happened after I started my occult practice seven years ago was that I ended up running head on into themes that echo throughout the core tenets of all the world’s major religions. This is all stuff I’d completely written off as ridiculous in my more rebellious youth. I rejected Christianity at age sixteen because, well, there are just too many holes in the logical infrastructure there to stand up to much of my youthful critical thinking.… Read the rest

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2013 – Year of the Witch (Midday Veil Edition)

As I was catching up on the always brilliant Phantasmaphile blog the other day (ran by the rather bewitching Pam Grossman), I noticed that she’d declared 2013 as the “year of the witch”. Hmmm, never occurred to me but let’s run with it. December 21, 2012 supposedly represented a shift in consciousness and I’ll be honest, I sort of feel like a psychic veil has in fact been subtly lifted. Has a new Aeon begun which will re-align us with the sacred shamanic feminine knowledge they used to build the pyramids? I think you’d have to look back on our era from at least fifty years in the future to make any sort of determination on that one. Let’s just remember that it’s fun to pretend that it did, and us doing so enriches the cosmic current of the macro-consciousness. The future already happened man.

So with this in mind, I’m gonna hopefully do a series of posts in 2013 about women artists, musicians, philosophers, etc.… Read the rest

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Happy Birthday Robert Anton Wilson!

To say that I have a complicated relationship with the writings of Robert Anton Wilson would be a bit of an understatement. Although I started reading his work in my early 20’s, I was never honestly that huge a superfan outside of the books Sex & Drugs (edited down from his original title of Sex, Drugs, and the Occult by his publisher – now re-released as Sex, Drugs, and Magick) and Cosmic Trigger I: Final Secret of the Illuminati. Yeah, strangely enough, the only other books I ever read by the guy were The Illuminatus Trilogy and Promethus Rising. Truthfully, I wasn’t even totally stoked on Illuminatus. Kind of thought it was structured almost intentionally lazily which gave him (and Robert Shea) the ability to write down whatever thoughts happened to pop into their heads while they were stoned with zero regard for structure. Because of that I would actually recommend the much more underrated DNA Cowboys Trilogy by Mick Farren if you’re into this sort of epic mindfuckery.… Read the rest

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‘Mapping the Occult City’ Conference Tackles Urban Esotericism

Frequent Disinfo.com contributor David B. Metcalfe will be a moderator at a November 16 conference titled “Mapping the Occult City: Exploring Magick and Esotericism in the Urban Utopia”. The conference will be held  at Chicago’s Richard M. and Maggy C. Dailey Building, and is a joint effort of DePaul University and Phoenix Rising Academy. If you’re near Chicago and enjoy esoteric topics like Ley Lines, occult practices and alchemy, then this could be a pretty fun Friday. Learn more here.

This conference is the first event organised by the Chicago Consortium under the direction of Dr. Jason Winslade. The focus and objectives of this event, as outlined in the Call for Papers, is as follows:
In his classic essay, “Walking in the City,” ethnologist and historian Michel de Certeau distinguished between the “exaltation of a scopic and gnostic drive” that comes from viewing the city from a high vantage point and the quotidian negotiations of the walker at street level, who creates his or her own map, takes shortcuts and resists the strategies of typical urban planning.

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Why Are Comics So Often Magick?

An excellent article in The Secret Sun blog “Comics are Magick: Daddy and the Pie” reports upon the association between magick* and comic books:

“Daddy and the Pie,” an alien encounter story from 1975 written by the late Bill DuBay (himself a student of the Kabbalah) and drawn by the late Alex Toth (himself an art god) [...] is sublime in so many ways but is remarkable in that it serves as a classic initiation narrative and leaves off at a point before the narrator reaches his ascension to occult mastery, which is obliquely- and ominously- referred to in the final paragraph.

The story in question deals with an alien encounter, which has been given a distinctly occult edge to it. It is to be found, reprinted in full, at The Secret Sun.

Alan Moore (Watchmen, Promethea and V for Vendetta), Pat Mills (Judge Dredd, Slaine, ABC Warriors) and Grant Morrison (The Invisibles, Superman, Batman) are three of the main notable comic book writers who have revealed in interviews that they use magick as part of their lives.… Read the rest

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William Butler Yeats: Poet and Practicing Magician

The Lapham Quarterly has published a rather excellent essay on W.B Yeats magical studies and his relationships with the Theosophical Society and the Golden Dawn. Of particular interest is the author’s take on why so many of the era’s most prominent thinkers and artists were  preoccupied with magic:

When Yeats arrived in London in 1887, the vogue for spiritualism was at its height, and the young poet was immediately sucked into the vortex. The implications of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution had sunk in and were undermining basic assumptions of the established social order. In 1867 Matthew Arnold had heard the “melancholy, long, withdrawing roar” of the Sea of Faith in retreat, and cults sprang up to fill the gap, to satisfy those who, like Yeats, were searching for something to believe in beyond the material world.

Read more at The Lapham Quarterly.

Hat tip: Revolt of the Apes

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