Tag Archives | Torture

American Psychological Association Investigates Role Psychologists Played in US Torture Program

On Friday, The Intercept reported that the American Psychological Association (APA) is launching an independent investigation into the role that psychologists (and its members) played in the U.S. torture program under the Bush administration. The role of doctors and clinical psychologists is not new to the awareness of the public, the administration or the APA. The question, really, is “what took so long?” for the self-regulated organization to open their own eyes to the activities of its members and the psychology community at large.

via The Intercept:

The top professional organization for psychologists is launching an independent investigation over how it may have sanctioned the brutal interrogation methods used against terror suspects by the Bush administration. The American Psychological Association announced this week that it has tapped an unaffiliated lawyer, David Hoffman, to lead the review.

In 2002, the American Psychological Association (APA) revised its code of ethics to allow practitioners to follow the “governing legal authority” in situations that seemed at odds with their duties as health professionals. Many argue that the revision, as well as a task force report in 2005 that affirmed that the code allowed psychologists to participate in national security interrogations, gave the Bush administration critical legal cover for torture.

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An Innocent Man, Tortured by the US, Asks the UN: Where’s the Accountability?

Camp Delta at Guantanamo Bay via Wikimedia Commons.

Camp Delta at Guantanamo Bay via Wikimedia Commons.

via The Intercept:

U.S. officials are in for a serious grilling on Wednesday as they get hauled before the U.N. Committee against Torture and questioned about about a multitude of ways in which the U.S. appears to be failing to comply with the anti-torture treaty it ratified 20 years ago.

As Jamil Dakwar, director of the ACLU Human Rights Program noted on Monday:

This marks the first U.N. review of the United States’ torture record since President Obama took office in 2009, and much is at stake. The review will test the pledges President Obama made to reverse disastrous Bush-era policies that led to gross violations of human rights, like torture, secret and incommunicado detention, “extraordinary renditions,” unfair trials, and more. It is also likely to examine practices that emerged or became entrenched during Obama’s time in office, such as indefinite detention at Guantánamo, immigration detention and deportations, and the militarization of the police, as witnessed by the world during this summer’s events in Ferguson.

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Burma: Body of human rights journalist Mr Aung Kyaw Naing found with possible evidence of torture

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via Front Line Defenders:

On 5 November 2014, during the exhumation of the body of human rights journalist Mr Aung Kyaw Naing, witnesses observed clear signs of torture which are believed to have been committed by the Burmese military forces during the time the journalist was held in incommunicado detention. He was later killed on 4 October 2014.

Aung Kyaw Naing, a freelance journalist from the city of Rangoon, regularly reported on human rights and ethnic issues along the Burma-Thai border and was a contributor for several local media groups, includingThe Voice, Eleven Media, and Yangon Times. On 30 September 2014 he was detained by governmental military forces in the Kyaikmayaw Township of Mon State, south-eastern Burma, when he returned there from insurgent-controlled territory. Prior to his detention the journalist was covering armed clashes in a region between Karen ethnic insurgents and the Burmese state army.

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Obama’s Support of Torture

Norman Pollack writes at CounterPunch:

And we thought the cold-blooded planning and execution of armed drone assassination vitiated any claim to moral character, a POTUS swaggering around on Air Force One methodically using drones and air power to destroy civilian targets and, as in the recent attacks on UN schools/shelters in Gaza, countenance—if not encourage-the same among friends and allies (Israel), now it is revealed by Charlie Savage of the New York Times, in an article, “Obama Could Reaffirm a Bush-Era Reading of a Treaty on Torture,” (Oct. 19), that our Nobelist Warrior is exquisitely parsing international treaties to allow for US TORTURE abroad, so long as not on the Homeland. Whether the program of torture or the rationale for its authorization is the greater Evil I leave to the professional philosophers to determine. But from here, America’s vanguard role, already the purveyor of global counterrevolution by all means possible, in this latest chapter of structural-political sadism, smells to high heavens.

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Guantanamo Force-Feeding Trial is a Breakthrough

Interrogation still 2Accountability for those responsible for the post 9/11 US torture program is a very slow process, but a new federal trial is a major step forward.

Judge Gladys Kessler of the DC District Court is hearing a case brought by Guantanamo detainee Abu Wa’el Dhiab and his lawyers against the very brutal method of force feeding used on the hunger strikers. Mr. Dhiab has been on hunger strike for over six years and was cleared for release in 2009, but is still in Guantanamo.

The case is about the method itself. Riot squads violently “extract” the detainee from his cell, strap him in a chair with five-point restraints and insert the tube in especially painful ways. (This procedure was shown in Doctors of the Dark Side with a description by a lawyer who succeeded in getting a more humane force feeding method for his client in a 2008 case.)

Judge Kessler recently ruled that videotapes of the force feeding procedure must be made public.… Read the rest

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When is torture okay?

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via Psychology Today:

Imagine that someone close to you was in imminent danger and the only solution involved having police use torture to extract information from a suspect in custody. Would you agree or not?

While torture remains a divisive topic with many countries around the world authorizing its use,  international human rights codes and the legal codes of most countries provide comprehensive legal protections against torture under any circumstances. Public opinion polls tend to be consistent in showing that only 34 percent of people worldwide actual endorse the use of torture though the numbers vary from country to country.  Still, despite the consensus that torture is both immoral and ineffective, both as a means of punishment and as a way of gaining information, controversy still surrounds its use. Issues such as  renditionwaterboarding, and the very definition of torture continue to influence international relations, especially given the current “War on Terror”  that shows no sign of ending.

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The CIA is getting away with keeping every important secret about torture

“A definitive Senate report about one of America’s darkest periods continues to be withheld – precisely because the agency behind it refuses to come clean,” writes Trevor Timm at The Guardian:

At this point, is there anything the Central Intelligence Agency thinks it can’t get away with?

To recap: the CIA systematically tortured people, then lied about it. Destroyed evidence of it, then lied about that. Spied on the US Senate staffers investigating the agency for torture, then lied about that. Now, after somehow being put in charge of deciding what parts of the Senate’s final report on that torture should be redacted, the CIA has predictively censored the key evidence of the litany of all of those transgressions.

The agency’s black marker has reportedly censored – at different points in the report – already-public, embarrassing and criminally culpable information. By doing so, the CIA has rendered it, as one Senator noted, “incomprehensible”.

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Obama Admits That CIA Tortured ‘Some Folks’

Still from "Doctors of the Dark Side"

Still from “Doctors of the Dark Side

Many Americans have called foul over the CIA torture program but up till now the US Government has steadfastly denied using interrogation techniques that were really torture. The documentary film Doctors of the Dark Side, for one, horrifyingly showed the complicity of American doctors and medical professionals in designing these torture techniques for the CIA and military. Now President Obama is finally admitting that it truly was torture, reports ABC News:

President Obama today admitted the CIA tortured al Qaeda detainees after the 9/11 attacks, saying “we did some things that were contrary to our values.”

“We tortured some folks,” the president told reporters at the White House, ahead of the release of a Senate report on enhanced interrogation techniques.

In a rare reflection on the practices that he banned after taking office, the president said, “I understand why it happened” and underscored the tremendous pressure that national security officials were under in the aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

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