Tag Archives | tourist attractions

Watch How The Creationism Museum Depicts Teachers Who Teach Evolution

Buzzfeed's Matt Stopera visited the Creation Museum in Kentucky and takes note of the various attractions and lessons learned. The centerpiece is a Universal Studios-style multimedia movie experience ("Just think how it could change her life if Wendy found out there really is purpose and meaning to her existence!") designed to cement kids' scorn and skepticism of evolution-spouting teachers, with a simple but effective message – caring about science is for nerds:
They had this special effects show in a big theater with shaking chairs and water sprinklers. It was pretty cool and very Disney. This part caught my attention, though. They were constantly tearing down teachers. Teachers who teach evolution are the worst!
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Salvation Mountain Creator Leonard Knight Dies At 82

salvation mountainThe Los Angeles Times reports the death of an eccentric visionary who assembled his own psychedelic-religious portal to another dimension out in the desert of California:
Leonard Knight, the lean New Englander who spent three decades joyously painting religious messages on a tall mound of adobe he called Salvation Mountain in the Imperial Valley desert, died Monday at age 82. His death was announced on his Salvation Mountain Facebook page by his devoted followers who have been attempting to preserve his labor of love east of the Salton Sea near the squatter village called Slab City. Until his health declined, Knight had lived in the back of his truck, sharing his space with a variety of cats without names, undeterred by the brutal desert heat or howling winds. To his amazement, Knight had become a favorite of folk art aficionados.
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Nuclear Reactor At Fukushima May Turned Into A Tourist Attraction

dark tourismA summer vacation spot that will give you a healthy glow? Thanks to a tip from Rhoid – Japan Today reports:

Paying visits to historic places where death and suffering occurred is known as “dark tourism.” After taking note that in 2011, or 25 years after the accident, the Chernobyl reactor site has become open to general tourism, a group of individuals in Japan is attempting to lay the groundwork for plans to make the No. 1 reactor at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant a tourist spot.

The group includes author-critic Hiroki Azuma, tourism scholar Akira Ide, artist Kazuki Umezawa, media activist Daisuke Tsuda, sociologist Hiroshi Akenuma, editor Kenro Hayami and architect Ryuji Fujiwara.

Along with providing a venue to convey their own histories to future generations, the members aim for the activities to be useful in aiding in recovery of the affected areas.

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The World’s Most Romantic Death Spot: Japan’s Suicide Volcano

Would you let yourself be consumed by burning love at an infamous volcano where thousands have taken the plunge? Providentia writes:

On February 11, 1933, a 21-year old student named Kiyoko Matsumoto committed suicide by throwing herself into the volcanic crater of Mount Mihara on the Japanese island of Izu Oshima. Matsumoto had developed an infatuation with fellow student Masako Tomita. Since lesbian relationships were considered taboo at the time, she and Tomita decided to travel to the volcano so that Matsumoto could end her life there,  [where] an observation post allowed visitors to look straight down into the lava.

To profit from Izu Oshima’s new popularity, the Tokyo Bay Steamship Company set up a daily steamship line to the island and the brim of Mount Mihara picked up the new name of “Suicide Point”. In 1933 alone, 944 people would jump into the crater. In the two years that followed saw an additional 350 suicides and visitors would often travel to Mount Mihara just to watch people jump.

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Suburban Sprawl Highways As Historic Tourist Attractions

3739750449_86e3796b18Is this what will become of the highway? The Guardian dissects the bizarre spectacle of sold-out bus tours of outer London's very bland M25 motorway:
Long in tedium and inescapably circular, the M25 is not so much The Road to Hell, as Chris Rea once sang, but life itself. However, Britain's least loved motorway was almost beneficent on Monday when viewed from the seats of the first sell-out coach tour of the 117-mile London orbital. There were several coach tours of the M25 in the 1980s and perhaps it is no coincidence that the 2012 version has proved so popular. The M25 was opened by Margaret Thatcher in 1986 and will endure as a monument to her era far longer than wars or broken unions. A visible symbol of individualism and the triumph of the car, the motorway was widened by the Blair government, building on the Iron Lady's legacy in every way.
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