Tag Archives | Trains

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop

The remarkable thing, to me anyway, is that Mr. Musk has really thought the Hyperloop concept through and come up with a plan that while seemingly fanciful, could actually work. The only snag is, now that he's announced it we'll probably see it copied and linking Shanghai and Beijing rather than Los Angeles and San Francisco. Elon outlines his ideas at his SpaceX site:
When the California “high speed” rail was approved, I was quite disappointed, as I know many others were too. How could it be that the home of Silicon Valley and JPL – doing incredible things like indexing all the world’s knowledge and putting rovers on Mars – would build a bullet train that is both one of the most expensive per mile and one of the slowest in the world? Note, I am hedging my statement slightly by saying “one of”. The head of the California high speed rail project called me to complain that it wasn’t the very slowest bullet train nor the very most expensive per mile. hyperloop The underlying motive for a statewide mass transit system is a good one. It would be great to have an alternative to flying or driving, but obviously only if it is actually better than flying or driving...
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Slab City, CA: A Tourist Spot You May Have Missed

The Good German's post on hobos and riding the rails reminded me of something I found last year. I had been watching a video about ridin' the rails when my roommate mentioned this place to me: Slab City, USA: The winter home for many 'bago bums and trailer tramps, the slabs evidently heat up too much in the high summer. But each fall this becomes the destination of many former wage slaves who have slipped the shackles of the prized 40 hour work week. Just don't mind the sounds of occasional explosions on the other side of the hill.
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LA to NY in 30 Minutes: 10,000 MPH Tunnel Train Used for Underground Bases?

Bullet TrainVia the Intel Hub:

The Vary High Speed Transit System (VHST) was a Rand Corporation concept that was presented to the military industrial complex in the 1970′s.

The concept was way ahead of it’s time, exactly what the secret sinister government needed to connect their vast expansions of underground bases throughout the United States and in various regions worldwide.

This could offer an explanation for some of the recent strange sounds and booms across the country. The late (and presumably murdered) Phil Schneider spoke about what he called an Electro Magneto Leviton Train System that traveled at speeds in excess of Mach 2.

The VHST and its proposed routes, (vast advanced tunnel systems) at the time of it’s conception in the early 1970′s, fit and follow other underground base researchers findings as well as some of my own. An interesting aspect within the Rand Corp. document is the fact that the tunnels are way to expansive to pump all of the air out at once to create the frictionless environment needed travel at speeds in excess of 10,000+ MPH.

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Have TSA Body Scanners Been Used On Trains and Even Sidewalks?

Got TSA?The TSA is, off course, denying this story. Andy Greenberg writes on Forbes’ FIREWALL:

Giving Transportation Security Administration agents a peek under your clothes may soon be a practice that goes well beyond airport checkpoints. Newly uncovered documents show that as early as 2006, the Department of Homeland Security has been planning pilot programs to deploy mobile scanning units that can be set up at public events and in train stations, along with mobile x-ray vans capable of scanning pedestrians on city streets.

The non-profit Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) on Wednesday published documents it obtained from the Department of Homeland Security showing that from 2006 to 2008 the agency planned a study of of new anti-terrorism technologies that EPIC believes raise serious privacy concerns. The projects range from what the DHS describes as “a walk through x-ray screening system that could be deployed at entrances to special events or other points of interest” to “covert inspection of moving subjects” employing the same backscatter imaging technology currently used in American airports.

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When Will A High-Speed Rail Plan Bring More Fast Trains to the U.S.?

Taichung Station

Photo: H. T. Yu. Taichung Station, Taiwan (CC)

Stuart F. Brown writes in Scientific American:

America is an absurdly backward country when it comes to passenger trains. As anyone who has visited Europe, Japan or Shanghai knows, trains that travel at nearly 200 miles per hour have become integral to the economies of many countries. With its celebrated Tokaido Shinkansen bullet trains, Central Japan Railway has for the past five decades carried billions of passengers between Tokyo and Osaka in half the time it would take to fly.

A new Madrid-to-Barcelona express train runs at an average speed of 150 miles per hour; since its inception two years ago, airline traffic between the two cities has dropped by 40 percent. In contrast, Amtrak’s showcase Acela train connecting Boston to Washington, D.C., averages just 70 mph. That figure is so low because many sections of the Acela’s tracks cannot safely support high speeds, even though the train itself is capable of sprints above 150 mph.

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