Transhumanism


biohacker

Via Motherboard, a preview of where you will be in ten years:

Tim Cannon got what is likely the first-ever computer chip implant that can record and transmit his biometrical data. With a battery that can be wirelessly charged, Cannon had it implanted directly under his skin by a fellow biohacking enthusiast, not a doctor, and without anesthesia.

Called the Circadia 1.0, the implant can record data from Cannon’s body and transfer it to any Android-powered mobile device. In a few months, the first production series of the Circadia chip should be ready. With an expected price of around $500, the chip should be relatively accessible for just about any enthusiast, and will mainly be distributed through the networks of the body modification community.




Want a glimpse of someone truly born far before their time? Circa 1989, the future-obsessed professor and consultant named FM-2030 (born Fereidoun M. Esfandiary) interviewed by Larry King, with befuddled call-ins from middle Americans. Author of a book titled Are You a Transhuman?: Monitoring and Stimulating Your Personal Rate of Growth in a Rapidly Changing World, FM-2030 told the public that they should be prepared and eager to evolve to “transhumans.” However, he emphasized a brand of super-optimistic futurism that was at its core not about technological advancement so much as becoming increasingly “humanity rich” – more open, empathetic, and compassionate. He died in 2000 and is currently cryogenically preserved, awaiting reanimation:







Color-changing skins? Giant, unwieldy craniums? Lobotomized smart-phone junkies? There was also a Daily Mail piece about how humans will eventually evolve beaks. Because why not? Evolution is obviously a complex process. But…



(c)2013 by alizardx This article is mainly intended to discuss ideas regarding DIY human augmentation (extending human senses, access to information, access to tools, ultimately increasing effective human intelligence, therapeutic devices) beyond…


Via amor mundi, Dale Carrico hopes to douse some sober reality onto those awaiting a transhumanist, technocratic future: Any child can indulge in wish fulfillment fantasizing. It’s not a philosophy [or] a…




KURZWEILAI: “Corporations are People, my friend” – and they might be slowing down evolution, or even preventing Utopia. The approaching Technological Singularity could bring drastic changes, such as rendering money obsolete via…



Picture an event where the bridge between the counterculture and academia is finally crossed. From live tech demonstrations to futuristic presentations to provocative performance art to live music we will take you…




CyberpunkGood day, Cybernauts. We’ve been enjoying this endearing flick for some time, but are just now getting around to posting about it.

Cyberpunk is a 60-minute documentary from 1990 that serves as a charming bookend to the William Gibson documentary No Maps for These Territories. While Gibson is featured prominently in this doc, it also expands out to illuminate an entire slice of the late ’80s/early ’90s culture that used to be featured in the late, great Mondo 2000 magazine.

Cyberpunk Review offers these insights:

Cyberpunk is a documentary that looks back at the 80s cyberpunk movement, and more specifically, how this has led to a trend in the “real” world where people were starting to refer to themselves as “cyberpunk.” The documentary sees “cyberpunks” as being synonymous with hackers. A number of writers, artists, musicians and scientists are interviewed to provide context to this movement. The guiding meme, as told by Gibson, is that information “wants” to be free. 60s counter-culture drug philosopher, Timothy Leary, provides a prediction that cyberpunks will “decentralize knowledge,” which will serve to remove power from those “in power” and bring it back to the masses. Many different potential technologies are discussed, including “smart drugs,” sentient machines, advanced prosthetics — all of which serve to give context to the idea of post-humanity and its imminent arrival on the world stage.




The above headline is from the good folks at The Onion, please read their story here. What is alarming is, if you watch this recent report from 60 Minutes, this really isn’t a joke.

I have to imagine the chemically induced behavior (i.e. “productivity”) makes it way into the workforce, what does this say about the state of America, is this is commonplace among the so-called best and brightest?