Trends

Remember “peer pressure”? Of late it has been largely discarded as the go-to means of explaining/demonizing youth behavioral patterns, but The New Inquiry offers a look back: Parents have mostly given up…



algoraveCan all digitally-created music really just be thought of as humans manipulating algorithms? If so, why not get to the heart of things? A burgeoning, extremely nerdy subculture called algorave revolves around generating, altering, and combining electronic sound loops via on-the-spot coding, using languages such as SuperCollider, with the coding projected on a large screen. Could this be the worst new form of music, or the most honest? Wikipedia writes:

An algorave is an event where people dance to music generated from algorithms, often using live coding techniques. Algoraves can include a range of styles, including a complex form of minimal techno, and has been described as a meeting point of hacker philosophy, geek culture, and clubbing.

The first self-proclaimed “algorave” was held as a warmup concert for the SuperCollider Symposium 2012. The first North American algorave took place in Hamilton, Ontario during the artcrawl of 9 August 2013.



Circa 1990, from the monthly VHS-format periodical Dance International Video Magazine, a segment set in the future describes a hypothetical fashion movement known as HyperStyle. Swathed in “barcodes, plastic fabrics, logo wear, Nusilk fabric, virus accessories”, HyperStyle adherents destabilize the corporate order by co-opting and devaluing brand identities…including barcode-vision goggles and NASA sweatpants:

Today’s crisis can be tracked back to 1990. During one of the first green-house summers, a new fashion appeared, that pirated the emerging corporate culture.

Perpet[r]ators of this style hijacking corporate technology graphics and exploited them through wearable clothing. First seen in London, England, c1990.

The designers did not vandalize the corporate imagery, but rather reproduced it exactly. The resultant confusion led to devaluation of corporate status.


Balkinization on the techno-utopian cult of disruption: Why is the term “disruption” so popular nowadays? Elite media features a parade of thinkers keen on “disrupting” old institutions. Talk of social contracts is…








Clearly the IBM trend analysts haven’t been allowed to visit the likes of Dragon*Con or Comic-Con in recent years as they’re just now realizing that it’s a real trend:

Based on an analysis of more than a half million public posts on message boards, blogs, social media sites and news sources, IBM predicts that ‘steampunk,’ a sub-genre inspired by the clothing, technology and social mores of Victorian society, will be a major trend to bubble up, and take hold, of the retail industry. Major fashion labels, accessories providers and jewelry makers are expected to integrate a steampunk aesthetic into their designs in the coming year.

Measuring public sentiment can help retail chief marketing officers customize incentives and services to be more in tune with what customers are asking for…



John Ozersky ponders the reasons for bacon’s stranglehold on American culture at Time: Taste Bacon does have a distinct, wonderful taste, as everyone knows. But you can’t really taste bacon when it’s…




Writing for The Quietus, Ryan Diduck looks at the recent ascendancy of haunted, bleak indie musical acts (Zola Jesus, Burial, A$AP Rocky, Fever Ray) and sub-genres, what he calls our new “cultural obsession…



PART ONE: WHAT IS A HIPSTER, AND WHY DOES EVERYONE HATE THEM? or: YOU’RE SO FAKE (AND SO AM I) My name is Tuna Ghost and I have a confession: I’m a…



No, it’s not an immutable law of nature. In the 1920s, retailers began encouraging pink (a strong color) for boys and blue (a dainty one) for girls, before the trend reversed after…