Tag Archives | Unexplained Phenomena

M’onma – Lucid Dreamings

From text by Randall Morris, quoted with permission.

Monma’s Lucid Dreamings

IMo 48 - 1

Looking for a cohesive narrative in one of M’onma’s drawings is like telling someone about a dream and then realizing that you are losing and changing the thread of the experience as you tell it…. The further in you get into the telling, the further you travel from the original way you remember it. It is a lot like a novel or short story by Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. One needs to move through the narrative without necessarily putting the pieces together. Add a healthy dose of Shinto and contemporary spiritual symbolisms and you begin to get an inkling into the dream world of M’onma. Murakami also must also allow himself to abandon concepts of rational sequence when he writes. In a way this brings one back to Surrealist concepts of automatic writing and allowing dream to occupy equal ground with temporal realities.… Read the rest

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Rupert Sheldrake on The Evolution of Telepathy

Via Rupert Sheldrake.org

My research on telepathy in animals, summarized in my book Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home and published in detail in a series of papers (listed below), led me to see telepathy as a normal, rather than a paranormal phenomenon, an aspect of communication between members of animal social groups. I see psychic phenomena as an extension of biology, which is why I, as a biologist, am interested in them. The same principles apply to human telepathy, and I have investigated little explored aspects of human telepathy, such as telepathy between mothers and babies, telephone telepathy (thinking of someone who soon afterwards calls) and email telepathy. I have designed several automated telepathy tests, some of which can be carried out through this website.

I think telepathy has evolved, like other biological abilities, subject to natural selection, and my lecture on the evolution of telepathy at Cambridge University is online here: Evolution of Telepathy .

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In Search Of A Science Of Consciousness

Capture Queen (CC BY 2.0)

Capture Queen (CC BY 2.0)

Via NPR:

Any color you choose can be matched by a mixture of short, medium and long wavelength light (i.e., blue, green and red light). This perceptual observation led to the formulation, early in the 19th century, of a neurophysiological hypothesis: The eye contains three kinds of distinct color-sensitive receptors (cones); just as colors themselves can be composed of lights of different spectral character, so we can see the vast range of visible color thanks to the joint operation of only three distinct kinds of receptors.

This is a beautiful example of the primacy of experience in the study of the brain-basis of consciousness. Before you can even begin to think about how the brain enables us to see or feel or (more generally) experience what we do, you need to pay careful attention to what our experience is actually like.

And, so, it was further attention to the experience that led scientists to realize the shortcomings of what came to be known as the Trichromatic Theory of Color.

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Mexico Crop Circles Appear Overnight On Christmas Eve Following Local Reports Of ‘Bright Lights’ [VIDEO]

via The Inquistr:

Some barley fields in Mexico’s Texcoco region were garnered with strange sprawling crop circle designs overnight Christmas Eve.

Crop circles have been appearing around the world for decades, many believing the often very intricate and massive designs to be messages from some otherworldly entity. Skeptics, meanwhile, have long called crop circles man-made poppycock.

Regardless, the fresh new crop circles in Mexico have sparked the curiosity of many, with hundreds of people and the media turning out in droves to witness the mysterious — and possibly alien — crop circle designs.

The mystery of the seven-hectare crop circle pattern that appeared in the Texcoco, Mexico, barley fields on Christmas eve remains unsolved, reports RT, along with several Mexican media outlets.

The Christmas Eve skies in the area of Mexico where the crop circles appeared were reportedly cloudy and rainy, but many locals in the Texcoco region, located about 25 kilometers from Mexico City, reported seeing bright lights in those skies overnight.

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Top 10 UFO Videos of 2014

The folks at OpenMinds compiled a nice list of the top 10 UFO Videos of 2014.

Via OpenMinds:

These are the best UFO videos of 2014, and most remain unidentified.

Top 10 lists are very subjective. I wonder if I am the first author to start a top 10 list admitting that. UFO video identification can often also be subjective. However, it is this author’s opinion that many of the following videos remain mysteries. Those that were identified either made a large impact, or were just cool lookin’.

This list is in no particular order. I do not necessarily feel that any are better than the other. But they are all very interesting. Every year I almost dread putting together the year in review story. I think, “Wow, not much happened that was that interesting. Am I going to be able to come up with a decent list?” Sure enough, every year I am pleasantly surprised by all of the great news that was covered over the last year.

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Anton LaVey Blackhouse Photographs 1998 by Nicholas Syracuse

 Nicholas Syracuse "LaVey Altar" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “LaVey Altar” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

Anton LaVey Blackhouse Photographs 1998 by Nicholas Syracuse 2012.

The house and HQ for the Church of Satan in San Francisco.

The house was leveled to make way for some cheap condos.

The murals were designed and painted by Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan, according to information provided to the photographer by LaVey’s daughter Karla.

Included in the exhibition “Abundatia Cornu Copiae” December 4 – February 28 2015

The photographs were taken in 1998 and printed in 2012.

at Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

http://www.shishigami.com/srfa/copiae/

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Octo" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Octo” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Fire" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Fire” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Devil" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Devil” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Merbeast" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Merbeast” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

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It’s Not Rape if He’s a God–Or Thinks He Is

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Via IEET:

Stories like the Virgin Birth lack freely given female consent. Why don’t they bother us more? Powerful gods and demi-gods impregnating human women—it’s a common theme in the history of religion, and it’s more than a little rapey.

Zeus comes to Danae in the form of a golden shower, cutting “the knot of intact virginity” and leaving her pregnant with the Greek hero, Perseus.

Jupiter forcibly overcomes Europa by transforming himself into a white bull and abducting her. He imprisons her on the Isle of Crete, over time fathering three children.

Pan copulates with a shepherdess to produce Hermes.

The legendary founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus are conceived when the Roman god Mars impregnates Rea Silvia, a vestal virgin.

Helen of Troy, the rare female offspring of a god-human mating, is produced when Zeus takes the form of a swan to get access to Leda.

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23 Things Terence McKenna Said Best, From DMT Sex To Telepathic Octopi

NOAA Ocean Explorer (CC BY-SA 2.0)

NOAA Ocean Explorer (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via Reset.me:

At 25, a friend introduced me to “Surfing Finnegans Wake,” in which a nasally man lectures for three hours, ostensibly off-the-cuff, on the psychedelic, boundary-dissolving experience of reading James Joyce. I remember thinking his voice sounded extra-terrestrial. It was Terence McKenna. Here’s a quote from the lecture, which will hopefully be blurbed on the next jacket cover of Finnegans Wake: “This [Finnegans Wake] comes about as close as anybody came to pushing the entire contents of the universe down into approximately 14 cubic inches.”

A year or so later, having forgotten about McKenna, I found the Psychedelic Salon, a podcast hosted by a friendly man named Lorenzo. It had hundreds of archived talks given by what seemed to be a community of people dedicated to psychedelics, and to a counter-culture movement of sorts. I wasn’t prepared to discover McKenna’s oeuvre.

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Is This a Dream? The Hitchhikers’ Guide to Lucid Dreaming

via Good Times Weekly:

A beginner’s guide to understanding and exploring the uncanny world of lucid dreams.

“Are you dreaming right now?” asks science writer and dream researcher David Jay Brown. We are sitting in the ivy-draped courtyard of Laili, next to a babbling fountain and a rowdy dinner party of 10.

“No!” I say, sure of the answer to such an absurd question.

“But how do you know?” he asks.

“I just know.”

“Well, have you tested it?” He picks up a fork and taps the wall. In a dream, maybe the tines would bend, he says. In a dream, the words on the menu would scramble the minute you looked away and looked back again. And if you plugged your nose and breathed out, you’d feel the air leaving your nostrils, even though they were plugged.

“Nope, not dreaming,” I say, through a pinched nose. But there’s an epiphany scratching around inside his point: even when fork tines bend with no effort and landscapes transform at the mere suggestion of thought, we accept what we’re experiencing in a dream as real.

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Simulations back up theory that Universe is a hologram

Kenneth Lu (CC BY 2.0)

Kenneth Lu (CC BY 2.0)

via Nature.com

A team of physicists has provided some of the clearest evidence yet that our Universe could be just one big projection.

In 1997, theoretical physicist Juan Maldacena proposed1 that an audacious model of the Universe in which gravity arises from infinitesimally thin, vibrating strings could be reinterpreted in terms of well-established physics. The mathematically intricate world of strings, which exist in nine dimensions of space plus one of time, would be merely a hologram: the real action would play out in a simpler, flatter cosmos where there is no gravity.

Maldacena’s idea thrilled physicists because it offered a way to put the popular but still unproven theory of strings on solid footing — and because it solved apparent inconsistencies between quantum physics and Einstein’s theory of gravity. It provided physicists with a mathematical Rosetta stone, a ‘duality’, that allowed them to translate back and forth between the two languages, and solve problems in one model that seemed intractable in the other and vice versa (see ‘Collaborative physics: String theory finds a bench mate‘).

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