Tag Archives | volcanos

Volcanoes Contribute to Recent Global Warming ‘Hiatus’

Pic: "Volcano" Lionel Walden ca. 1880 (PD)

Pic: “Volcano” Lionel Walden ca. 1880 (PD)

Volcanoes, the cause of global warming?  Au contraire, they’re an antidote!  Via ScienceDaily:

Volcanic eruptions in the early part of the 21st century have cooled the planet, according to a study led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This cooling partly offset the warming produced by greenhouse gases.

Despite continuing increases in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and in the total heat content of the ocean, global-mean temperatures at the surface of the planet and in the troposphere (the lowest portion of Earth’s atmosphere) have shown relatively little warming since 1998. This so-called ‘slow-down’ or ‘hiatus’ has received considerable scientific, political and popular attention. The volcanic contribution to the ‘slow-down’ is the subject of a new paper appearing in the Feb. 23 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience.

Volcanic eruptions inject sulfur dioxide gas into the atmosphere. If the eruptions are large enough to add sulfur dioxide to the stratosphere (the atmospheric layer above the troposphere), the gas forms tiny droplets of sulfuric acid, also known as “volcanic aerosols.” These droplets reflect some portion of the incoming sunlight back into space, cooling Earth’s surface and the lower atmosphere.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Ancients Painted Volcano Warning 9,000 Years Ago

newpag1The world’s earliest landscape painting warned of a nearby volcano.

Via Discovery:

A nearly 9,000-year-old mural of a village with a backdrop of an erupting volcano has now been geochemically pinned to a specific eruption of the Hasan Dağ twin-peaks volcano located about 130 km (70 miles) northeast of the ancient Çatalhöyük town site in Turkey.

The mural, painted in ocher on an adobe wall that was long buried, has long been considered the world’s earliest depiction of an eruption, as well as the earliest known landscape painting, the first historical news event and the first urban plan. Until now, however the volcano it was depicting had not been confirmed with any dated samples of minerals from the volcano linking the image to a specific eruption.

Keep reading.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Bigfoot’s Grave For Sale In Oregon

Never forget—Bigfoot allegedly perished in the disastrous 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Now you can buy the spot where remains may lie. Oregon’s Willamette Week reports:

A real estate offer too good to exist: The owners of the defunct roadside attraction North Fork Survivors Gift Shop—which memorializes the 1980 explosion of Mount St. Helens and the subsequent death of Bigfoot—are selling their property.

The cost to own the gift shop, a 28-foot concrete Bigfoot statue, and a buried A-frame house swamped in flowing Mount St. Helens ash? Just $270,000, and they’ll throw in nine acres, a 1,120-square-foot house, restrooms, and a helicopter landing pad.

The tourist site, which honored the possible demise of Sasquatch by erecting the giant grinning statue, is located along Spirit Lake Highway in Toutle, Wash., less than 60 miles from Portland.

Read the rest

Continue Reading