War On Drugs


Not that anyone in Washington is likely to be listening, but bad boy film director Quentin Tarantino makes a very good point. Movieline reports on his interview with disinformation ally Strombo:

Quentin Tarantino says slavery continues in the United States.  The outspoken filmmaker — whose spaghetti southern Django Unchained unflinchingly depicts the brutality of slavery — stoked the debate on race Tuesday night when he appeared on the Canadian television talk show George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight to suggest that the United States’ “war on drugs” and  its “mass incarcerations” of black men is “just slavery through and through.”

Tarantino didn’t cite these figures, but he could have: According to the  New York Times, half of the 2.3 million Americans in prison or jail are black, an astonishing figure when compared to 2011 U.S. Censusinformation that indicates blacks comprise only 13.1 percent of the country’s population.

In other words, he’s got a point, and this is a conversation our country should stop avoiding…





Via Information Liberation:

You may or may not remember last year’s “Breakfast in Collinsville” video recorded by two men who were illegally stopped and searched by a K9 officer on their way back from a Star Trek convention. (Link Here). Well, the story has just taken an interesting turn: During a five hour deposition conducted by one of the men’s lawyers, the officer involved admitted that he sometimes plants drugs on the vehicles of unsuspecting strangers to test his K9’s drug detection abilities. Not coincidentally, many of these same “strangers” are later targeted for traffic stops. Sounds legit, right? Watch below, and be sure to record your utter surprise and loss of faith in our legal system in the comments section below.





Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In tells the stories of individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the narcotics officer, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s criminal justice system, revealing the profound human rights implications of U.S. drug policy. Winner of the 2012 Sundance Grand Jury Prize, The House I Live In will be released in theaters on October 5th.





As the financially and morally expensive Drug War rages on, it’s become all too obvious to most of us how futile the efforts of those ‘powers that be’ have been. Virgin Group’s Richard Branson sponsored a global survey that found over 90% of respondents around the world say the War on Drugs has failed. Technology giants like Google may even make a bigger difference when it comes to battling the big Mexican cartels, and Anonymous has even joined the digital fray. While still a very dangerous game (the cartels have been deadly and merciless in their retribution against online critics in the past), it is clear that the current actions of our governments are not working. In fact, incompetence, mixed messaging and/or collusion have only benefited the drug trade.

Since all the facts and figures can be overwhelming, here is a tasty infographic (sent by Camille Brockman) on the wasted tax dollars, inverse consequences, and cost to human lives…





Disinformation author Ed Rampell (Progressive Hollywood) has an exclusive interview with Oliver Stone about his new movie Savages. The Oscar winning director of Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July and Wall…


There’s some reefer madness going on at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Eric W. Dolan reports for The Raw Story:

During a House Judiciary Subcommittee hearing on Wednesday, Drug Enforcement Administrator Michele Leonhart repeatedly refused to admit that anything was more addictive or harmful than marijuana.

Democratic Rep. Jared Polis of Colorado pressed Leonhart on whether illegal drugs like methamphetamine and crack, as well as legal prescription drugs, caused greater harm to public health compared to marijuana. But within a three minute time-span, Leonhart dodged his questions eleven times.

“Is crack worse for a person than marijuana?”…


Natasha Vargas-Cooper reaches deep into “the heart America’s new drug nightmare” (which is, ahem, bath salts), for SPIN: COLUMBUS, OH— On an unseasonably hot and muggy May afternoon, a squad of armed…



Via RT:

It’s been nearly 20 years since Clarence Aaron was put in jail for conspiring to distribute crack cocaine, and unless President Obama steps in, the 19-year veteran of the American prison system is expected to stay there for a while. A long while.

Aaron wasn’t buying, selling or even touching coke when cops busted the then 23-year-old college student in 1993. Instead Aaron was simply a witness of a plotted crack transaction and associate of the buyer and seller, who, unlike him, pled guilty and gave law enforcement their full cooperation. But despite lacking any criminal record at all, however, Aaron was sentenced to serve three life sentences behind bars for his role in a would-be drug deal. Neither President Clinton nor George W. Bush offered a commutation to kill the lengthy sentence during their combined 16 years in office, and new evidence reveals that there may have been a reason for that.

An investigation launched by the website ProPublica reveals that the Bush White House was never informed of the facts of the case accounted for in a confidential Justice Department review, and that only now are America’s leaders being brought up to snuff as far as what needs to be known in the case of Clarence Aaron…


Writes Eric W. Dolan on RAW Story:

Nearly three out of four Americans believe that the federal government should respect state laws regarding medical marijuana and halt raids on dispensaries, according to a poll released.

“These results are consistent with the clear and growing body of evidence that documents substantial voter support for the legalization of medical marijuana,” said Larry Harris, a principal with Mason-Dixon Polling & Research.

The polling agency found that 74 percent of Americans believed the federal government should respect states’ medical marijuana laws. Support for medical marijuana laws was highest among Independents, at 79 percent, and lowest among Republicans, at 67 percent. Younger age groups were more likely to think the federal government should respect medical marijuana laws than older age groups…



Penn's Sunday SchoolVia Penn’s Sunday School:

On a recent episode of his podcast, Penn Jillette unleashed his thoughts on the Obama administration’s handling of the War on Drugs, calling President Obama’s actions “beyond hypocrisy” regarding his own admitted drug use.

Penn said: “He would have done hard fucking time! And if he had done hard fucking time, he would NOT be President of the United States of America, and he would NOT have gone to his fancy ass college, and he would NOT have sold books that sold millions and millions of copies and made millions and millions of fucking dollars, he would NOT have a beautiful, smart wife, he would NOT have a great job. He would have been in fucking prison, and it’s not a goddamn joke!”