Tag Archives | War

The Bloodiest Century on Earth and the Fifth Miracle

Aaron Dames writes for Divided Core.

Beyond M31 is another very similar galaxy – its spiral arms slowly turning once every quarter-billion years.  This is our own Milky Way, seen from the outside.  This is the home galaxy of the human species.  In the obscure backwaters of the Carina-Cygnus spiral arm, we humans have evolved to conscience and some measure of understanding.  Concentrated in its brilliant core and strewn along its spiral arms are four-hundred-billion suns.  It takes light a hundred-thousand years to travel from one end of the galaxy to the other.  Within this galaxy are stars and worlds and, it may be, an enormous diversity of living things and intelligent beings and space-faring civilizations… In the Milky Way galaxy, there may be many worlds on which matter has grown to consciousness.  I wonder: are they very different from us?  What do they look like?   What are their politics, technology, music, religion? 

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The Pentagon’s Law of War Manual

The US Department of Defense published its “Law of War Manual” in June and now the World Socialist Web Site dissects some of the more controversial provisions:

The new US Department of Defense Law of War Manual is essentially a guidebook for violating international and domestic law and committing war crimes. The 1,165-page document, dated June 2015 and recently made available online, is not a statement of existing law as much as a compendium of what the Pentagon wishes the law to be.

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According to the manual, the “law of war” (i.e., the law of war according to the Pentagon) supersedes international human rights treaties as well as the US Constitution.

The manual authorizes the killing of civilians during armed conflict and establishes a framework for mass military detentions . Journalists, according to the manual, can be censored and punished as spies on the say-so of military officials. The manual freely discusses the use of nuclear weapons, and it does not prohibit napalm, depleted uranium munitions, cluster bombs or other indiscriminate weapons.

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Canada’s PM-Designate to Obama: I’m Withdrawing Canadian Forces from Iraq and Syria

Justin Trudeau speaks at the University of Waterloo
This article originally appeared on Anti-Media.

Canada has a new government following the country’s federal election on Monday. The Liberal Party won in a landslide and dethroned Conservatives, who held the majority in the Parliament for nine years. Canada’s current prime minister, Stephen Harper, was also ousted by Liberal Party candidate, Justin Trudeau amid the Parliamentary takeover.

The Liberal Party has vowed to end the prohibition of cannabis, but also ran on a much more dovish foreign policy platform. It seems that Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau was serious about his vow to remove Canada from foreign entanglements. Just hours after his announced victory, he received a phone call from President Barack Obama.

Trudeau confirmed in a press conference that during the call, he told Obama he would stick to “the commitments I have made around ending the combat mission.” One of those commitments is to withdraw Canada’s CF-18 fighter jets from the conflict in Iraq and Syria, effectively ending Canada’s fight against ISIS.… Read the rest

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The Use and Abuse of Culture (and Children): The Human Terrain System’s Rationalization of Pedophilia in Afghanistan

Action in Afghanistan
David Price and Roberto J. González write at CounterPunch:

Over the past eight years, news reports gradually revealed that Afghan soldiers and police officers allied with US military forces are sexually abusing young boys held against their will—sometimes on US military bases. Last month, Joseph Goldstein (2015) published a front page story in the New York Times under the headline “US Soldiers Told to Ignore Sexual Abuse of Boys by Afghan Allies,” which opened with the disturbing story of Lance Corporal Gregory Buckley Jr., who was fatally shot along with two other Marines in 2012. Buckley was killed after he raised concerns about the American military’s tolerance of child sexual abuse practiced by Afghan police officers on the base where he was stationed in southern Afghanistan. Buckley’s father told the Times that “my son said that his officers told him to look the other way because it’s their culture.”

The Times story provides the now standard boilerplate narrative that adult men having sex with young boys–some as young as twelve years old–exemplify a culture complex known as bacha bazi, or “boy play.” But it also includes vignettes of US soldiers walking into rooms of Afghan men bedded with young boys, a young teenage girl raped by a militia commander while working in the fields, and the story of a former Special Forces Captain, Dan Quinn, who was disciplined after beating an Afghan militia commander who was “keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave” (Goldstein 2015).

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The Syrian war has caused the first-ever withdrawal from the doomsday seed vault

Nye frø ankommer
“The Middle East needs crops.”

Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert:

The civil war in Syria has prompted the first withdrawal from the Arctic ‘doomsday vault’ – a seed storage unit built on an island between Norway and the North Pole, to safe-guard the world’s food supply in the event of a global catastrophy, such as an outbreak of disease or nuclear war.

Researchers in the Middle East have now asked to withdraw a range of drought-resistant crop seeds, including wheat, barley, and grasses, from the vault. They would usually get these seeds from a facility in Aleppo, Syria, but even though the seeds are still there and safe in cold storage, the scientists are unable to access them as a result of damage to the surrounding buildings caused by the war.

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9/11 and the Belligerent Empire

In September 11th’s episode of The Empire Files on TeleSUR, Abby Martin examines the two major wars launched under the “Global War on Terror” – their historical development and their aftermath. Featuring former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, this episode digs into the tragedy of a region shaped by Empire.

teleSUR’s The Empire Files airs every Friday night at 10:00 pm EST and is archived at youtube.com/EmpireFiles

FOLLOW @EmpireFiles & @AbbyMartin
LIKE http://facebook.com/TheEmpireFiles

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The New Art of War: How trolls, hackers and spies are rewriting the rules of conflict

Is the Art of War different if it’s a cyberwar? Tech Republic glamorizes hackers and trolls:

Cyberwar isn’t going to be about hacking power stations. It’s going to be far more subtle, and more dangerous.

Wandering the pretty, medieval streets of Tallinn’s old town, it is hard to believe that the tiny country of Estonia has anything at all to do with cyberwarfare. But first as victim of an attack and now as home to some of the leading thinkers on how the digital battlefield will develop, the country has played a key role in its emergence and evolution.

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Estonia is a country of around 1.3 million people, facing the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Finland, it borders Latvia to the south and Russia to the east. After decades as part of the Soviet Union, it regained independence in 1991.

Even today reminders of the Soviet times still abound in the capital Tallinn.

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Canada’s secret plan to invade the U.S. — in 1921

Defence Scheme No. 1: A Canadian lieutenant fashioned a five-pronged plan of attack against the U.S. in 1921. Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

Defence Scheme No. 1: A Canadian lieutenant fashioned a five-pronged plan of attack against the U.S. in 1921. Courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press

In 1921, Canadian lieutenant, Buster Brown, proposed “Defence Scheme No. 1.,” which was actually a plan for a “full-on invasion” of the United States. In response, US then drafted its own: “War Plan Red.”

Not surprisingly, the tensions were really between the US and Britain. Canada was just the middle man.

Tracy Mumford via MPRNews:

Obviously, it never came to fruition. The tensions driving the potential invasion were actually between the U.S. and Britain. Canada was simply a proxy. After World War I, Britain owed the U.S. a tremendous amount of money — approximately $22 billion — and there were intense disagreements over the payment terms.

The disagreements were heated enough for the U.S. to draft a plan of its own in 1930, which it dubbed “War Plan Red.”

“Americans at that time, everybody seemed to think it was just a matter of time before Canada would be absorbed into the U.S.,” Lippert said.

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Militarism Run Amok: How Russians and Americans are Preparing Their Children for War

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Lawrence Wittner writes at CounterPunch:

In 1915, a mother’s protest against funneling children into war became the theme of a new American song, “I Didn’t Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier.” Although the ballad attained great popularity, not everyone liked it. Theodore Roosevelt, a leading militarist of the era, retorted that the proper place for women who criticized war was “in a harem―and not in the United States.”

Roosevelt would be happy to learn that, a century later, preparing children for war continues unabated.

That’s certainly the case in today’s Russia, where thousands of government-funded clubs are producing what is called “military-patriotic education” for children. Accepting both boys and girls, these clubs teach them military exercises, some of which employ heavy military equipment. In a small town outside St. Petersburg, for example, children ranging from five to 17 years of age spend evenings learning how to fight and use military weapons.

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