Tag Archives | Weird

Silicon Valley man unwittingly invites fugitive into home amid manhunt

By Christian Rondeau via Flickr.

By Christian Rondeau via Flickr.

via Reuters:

(Reuters) – A Silicon Valley homeowner unwittingly welcomed a fugitive into his home and shared a meal with the wanted man as California law enforcement officers canvassed the neighborhood in a manhunt, police said on Tuesday.

Police in Palo Alto launched the search after receiving an emergency call on Monday about a possible fraudulent bank transaction linked to a man wanted in Oklahoma for a sex crime with a minor, the city’s police department said.

Officers tried to nab 35-year-old Dominique Tabb of San Francisco at the bank, but he hopped a fence and ran into a residential neighborhood where officers began a yard-to-yard search, Palo Alto Detective Sergeant Brian Philip said.

A homeowner in his 60s saw Tabb in his yard with some minor scrapes, and Tabb told him that assailants had beaten him up and that he was trying to escape, police said.

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Man who ate napkins to conceal insider trading pleads guilty

By Ged Carroll via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

By Ged Carroll via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Reuters:

A Brooklyn, New York mortgage broker, who would scribble secret stock tips on napkins and pass them to an accomplice in Grand Central station before eating them, pleaded guilty to insider trading on Friday, federal prosecutors said.

Frank Tamayo, 41, was the middleman in what prosecutors called a three-man scheme that generated $5.6 million in illegal profits over five years, based on tips about a dozen transactions being negotiated by a prestigious New York law firm.

Tamayo, who had been cooperating with authorities, pleaded guilty to securities fraud, tender offer fraud, and conspiracy charges in the federal court in Trenton, New Jersey, according to U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman in New Jersey.

The defendant also agreed to forfeit more than $1 million, the contents of two brokerage accounts, and a 2008 Audi Q7. He faces up to 20 years in prison on the fraud counts.

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The Weirdest Massage Technique: Rolling Down a Flight of Concrete Stairs

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via Oddity Central:

Of all the unusual ways to get a massage, this has got to be the weirdest one. 51-year-old Li Chia rolls himself down 30 concrete steps every morning at Xi’an Changle Park. Once he gets to the bottom, he rocks himself back up to the top again without getting up, using a careful, self-taught technique. He claims that by doing this he receives a thorough massage that addresses all the pressure points in his body.

“I got the idea from rolling on pebbles at a health club, and when I couldn’t find any pebbles at my local park, I decided to try the stairs and was surprised to find it really works,” Chia explained. “I have always been a great fan of Chinese massage and the possibility that pressure points can do all sorts of things including relieving stress. After all, that’s why massage is so popular,” he said.

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Why Corporations Need Weirdos

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If you’re a regular disinfonaut there’s a good chance that you might fit a corporate employer’s concept of “weirdo.” Should you for some reason actually want to work for that kind of employer, Business Week suggests this might be the time to apply:

We need to expand our definition of diversity to include the weird—a group often maligned and avoided. These are people who appear to us as different, strange, and even offbeat; they just don’t fit in.

There is potency and innovativeness in certain kinds of weirdness that can help businesses thrive.

The key for leaders is to figure out how to support weird people so that they create—not destroy—value for the company. Some of these people have stifled their offbeat creativity out of social fear, camouflaging their true selves because they think it’s not appropriate at work to be as they really are. They leave essential parts of themselves at the office door.

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Russian Teens Build Swimming Pool in Living Room

I saw this on Reddit and now it appears to be making its rounds on the Internet. How do they plan on removing the water? What if the cover breaks? The whole thing gives me anxiety.

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via Dangerous Minds:

Two enterprising teenagers have found a novel answer to Moscow’s current heatwave by turning a living room into their very own mini indoor pool. The big question is, whose front room have they used?

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Photos appeared on social networks of the two nameless lads bathing in their DIY paddling pool. According to the Moscow Times, the pool was constructed “using a basic tarpaulin and held in place by Scotch tape”.

The boys, who hail from the Oryol region about 350 kilometers southwest of Moscow, where temperatures rose above 30 C this week according to the weather bureau, were seemingly oblivious to their unconventional setting as they posed for pool snaps amongst a radiator, some curtains and a chandelier.

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Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World: Here’s Why

WeirdTalesv36n1pg127_False_Teeth_ModelAnthropologist Joe Henrich and colleagues have studied the American mind, and comparing it to the rest of the world, their findings suggest that the nation’s citizens are the “weirdest” in the world. Must explain why journalists like Louis Theroux and Jon Ronson spend so much of their time here.

Via PSmag:

I had to wonder whether describing the Western mind, and the American mind in particular, as weird suggested that our cognition is not just different but somehow malformed or twisted. In their paper the trio pointed out cross-cultural studies that suggest that the “weird” Western mind is the most self-aggrandizing and egotistical on the planet: we are more likely to promote ourselves as individuals versus advancing as a group. WEIRD minds are also more analytic, possessing the tendency to telescope in on an object of interest rather than understanding that object in the context of what is around it.

The WEIRD mind also appears to be unique in terms of how it comes to understand and interact with the natural world.

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King Tut’s Body Spontaneously Combusted

mummyfireHoly Flaming Mummies, Batman! If “Burning Mummy” doesn’t become a stoner rock band name by next week I’m going to be very disappointed.

Via Raw Story:

Egyptologist Chris Nauton, the director of the Egypt Exploration Society, and a team of car crash investigators ran computer simulations that lend credence to the increasingly accepted theory that Tutankhamun was killed in a chariot accident. The simulations showed that the injuries scaling down one side of his body are consistent with a high-speed collision.

But it is the possibility of a botched mummification and its consequences that really interest Nauton.

“Despite all the attention Tut’s mummy has received over the years the full extent of its strange condition has largely been overlooked,” he said. “The charring and possibility that a botched mummification led the body spontaneously combusting shortly after burial was entirely unexpected, something of a revelation in fact.”

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Are you Naturally Unnatural?

Most self respecting Disinfonaughts will, at some point or other, have been condemned for the crime of being ‘weird’ or ‘abnormal’. These words play on an implicit root assumption that anything ‘unnatural’ is in some sense immoral or evil. Rest assured that those who try to attack you with such labels imprison only themselves. The truth, in a literal sense, is that there is nothing in this universe which is “unnatural”. Even metaphorically the word “unnatural” is almost irrelevant because our minds cannot glimpse that which it describes and can only hypothesise that it might exist.

The writer Philip Ball, in a piece on his website entitled “Unnatural: The Talk Based On The Book“,[1] says:

“[T]o call something unnatural is not an act of taxonomy but a moral judgement. The unnatural act is something we are supposed to condemn. [...] Our disapproval stems from the theological tradition of natural law [..which..] plays out in a rationalistic yet teleological universe in which everything has a part to play, and all things have a ‘natural end’ which, being ordained by God, is intrinsically good.”

Here he is speaking about moral judgements suggested by the word in relation to controversies in science surrounding genetic engineering or cloning.… Read the rest

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