Whistleblowers








It must be a relief to finally leave purgatory, but is Edward Snowden entering Heaven or Hell? From Russia Today:

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has been granted temporary asylum in Russia and is allowed to enter the country’s territory.

The whistleblower has been granted temporary political asylum in Russia, Snowden’s legal representative Anatoly Kucherena said.

“I have just handed over to him papers from the Russian Immigration Service. They are what he needs to leave the transit zone,” he added.

Kucherena showed a photocopy of the document to the press….


Bradley Manning’s conviction at his long running trial is breaking news everywhere, this version from CNN:

A military judge has found Pfc. Bradley Manning, accused of the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, not guilty of aiding the enemy — a charge that would have carried a maximum sentence of life in prison.

Manning was also found not guilty of unauthorized possession of information relating to national defense.

He was found guilty of most of the remaining charges against him, with the judge accepting some of the guilty pleas he made previously to lesser charges…








On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin breaks down the latest surveillance scandal by the National Security Agency, in which the servers of firms such as Google, Facebook, and Apple…




When the odds are stacked this heavily against whistleblowers, there’s not much incentive to rat out wrongdoers. Matt Taibbi looks at how even the courts are in on it, for Rolling Stone:

A great many people around the county were rightfully shocked and horrified by the recent excellent and hard-hitting PBS documentary, The Untouchables, which looked at the problem of high-ranking Wall Street crooks going unpunished in the wake of the financial crisis. The PBS piece certainly rattled some cages, particularly in Washington, in a way that few media efforts succeed in doing.

Now, two very interesting and upsetting footnotes to that groundbreaking documentary have emerged in the last weeks.

The first involves one of the people interviewed for the story, a former high-ranking executive from Countrywide financial who turned whistleblower named Michael Winston…


On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin talks about the threat against indigenous sovereignty and the growth of the Idle No More movement beyond Canada; calls out the corporate media for their obsession with supermodels and instead highlights a successful lawsuit against defense contractor L-3 Services for torture at Iraq’s infamous Abu Ghraib Prison; talks to whistleblower and lawyer, Jesselyn Radack, about recent developments in the cases of ex CIA official John Kiriakou, and PFC Bradley Manning; BTS wraps up the show with a look at the Cuban Five, a group of Cuban intelligence agents who have been incarcerated in the US since 1998 as the forgotten political prisoners of the Cold War.



Sierra Adamson talks to Jeremy Scahill, author of Blackwater and writer for The National, about some of the under-reported issues such as drone strikes in the Middle East, Obama’s kill list/Disposition Matrix, NDAA, use of the Espionage Act against whistle-blowers. Jeremy talks about the assassination of the 16 year old American citizen, Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, who was killed by a drone strike authorized by President Obama and the response Robert Gibbs recently gave us when we questioned him on it. He discusses the left’s disregard of their anti-war principles in favor of being loyal to leaders in their own party and the war propaganda that is fed to Americans through mass media.

Via WeAreChange




F-22 RaptorDraw your own conclusions, but where active members of the military speak out, we all should be listening.

As reported by 60 Minutes:

Military officers rarely speak out against their services, but in our lead story you’ll hear from two elite pilots who question the safety of Air Force’s most sophisticated, stealthy, and expensive fighter jet, the F-22 Raptor. Maj. Jeremy Gordon and Capt. Joshua Wilson have chosen to stop flying the F-22 because they say during some flights they and other pilots have experienced oxygen deprivation, disorientation, and worse. They are concerned about their safety in the air, as well as the long-term health consequences. The Air Force says it is doing all it can to investigate and solve the problem, and are keeping the jets in the air with careful supervision of the pilots.