Tag Archives | wisdom

The Sacred Mysteries of Quetzalcoatl

Behold, I send you forth as sheep [neophytes] in the midst of wolves [the profane]: be ye therefore wise as serpents [magicians], and harmless as doves [mystics]. Matthew 10:16

English: Quetzalcoatl, God of Wisdom

Quetzalcoatl, God of Wisdom (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

via Gnostic Teachings

Unquestionably, the theme of Quetzalcoatl is transcendental and deserves to be reflected upon profoundly.

First of all, I have to emphatically state with complete clarity that Quetzalcoatl is not a myth.  Unquestionably Quetzalcoatl is the great Word, the Platonic Logos, the Demiurge Architect of the Universe, the Creator.

When we study Quetzalcoatl, we then discover that within it there exists the same Cosmic Drama of Yeshua Ben Pandira (Jesus Christ).  Quetzalcoatl carrying his cross on his shoulders reminds us precisely of the Martyr of Calvary.

Thus, indeed, Quetzalcoatl is the Logos; he is what is, what was, and what will always be; he is the life that palpitates within every sun.  So before the Universe came into existence, Quetzalcoatl already existed.

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The Wisdom in the Dark Emotions

eclipseMiriam Greenspan, writing in the January 2003 issue of the Shambala Sun:

I was brought to the practice of mindfulness more than two decades ago by the death of my first child. Aaron died two months after he was born, never having left the hospital. Shortly after that, a friend introduced me to a teacher from whom I learned the basics of Vipassana meditation: how to breathe mindfully and meditate with “choiceless” awareness. I remember attending a dharma talk in a room full of fifty meditators. The teacher spoke about the Four Noble Truths. Life is inherently unsatisfactory, he said. The ego’s restless desires are no sooner fulfilled than they find new objects. Craving and aversion breed suffering. One of his examples was waiting in line for a movie and then not getting in.

I asked: “But what if you’re not suffering because of some trivial attachment? What if it’s about something significant, like death?

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College Students Call Out NSA Recruiters as Professional Liars

NSAStudents Question #NSA Recruiters Over Illegal Spying and Lies

from ActivistPost.com:

When NSA recruiters went to the University of Wisconsin earlier this week to pitch language students on working for the agency, they got more than they bargained for.

The informed students turned the question-and-answer session into a hearing. On trial were the NSA’s lies, their legality, and how they define “adversary”.

The students recorded audio of the exchange on an iPhone proving that the language-analyst NSA recruiters were left tongue-tied.

“I’m surprised that for language analysts you’re incredibly imprecise with your language,” grad student Madiha Tahir charged when they failed to define what constitutes an adversary.

“What you’re selling us is untrue” she added. “We also know that the NSA took down brochures and fact sheets after the Snowden revelations because those fact sheets had severe inaccuracies and untruths in them — so how are we supposed to believe what you’re saying?”

Another student directly challenged the NSA’s morality for using the “globe as their playground” and then partying at the office with co-workers.

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The Forgotten Mystic Secrets Of Athanasius Kircher

Writers No One Reads on the incredible genius of Athanasius Kircher, a sort of bizarro-da-Vinci who created jaw-dropping inventions and surreal, lavishly illustrated science books covering topics such as the people who live inside the earth:

Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680) [was] a Jesuit priest and polymath who wrote more than thirty big books on everything from optics, acoustics, linguistics, and mathematics to cryptology, Egyptology, numerology, and Sinology.

Kircher wasn’t just a writer. He was an inventor of speaking statues, eavesdropping devices, and musical machines. (He is alleged to have invented an instrument called the cat piano.) He was the curator of an early modern museum — a cabinet of curiosities featuring the tailbones of a mermaid and a brick from the Tower of Babel — at the Jesuit college in Rome. He pursued his interest in geological matters by climbing down inside the smoking crater of Mount Vesuvius. And he was perhaps the first to use a microscope to examine human blood.

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