Tag Archives | Witchcraft

Swaziland Bans Witches From Flying Above 150 Meters

ban witches

Can the law effectively contain the supernatural? From truTV:

Authorities in Swaziland, who are very serious about their witches, have enacted revolutionary new legislation intended to regulate all witch air traffic over their country.

Specifically, Swaziland may be the only country to have ever attempted to regulate witch air traffic. The new legislation stipulates that witches on broomsticks flying over Swaziland may not fly higher than 150 meters.

The Civil Aviation Authority’s Marketing and Corporate Affairs Director, Sabelo Dlamini, confirmed the new flight limitations for South Africa’s Times Live: “A witch on a broomstick should not fly above the [150-metre] limit.” Any witches caught violating the altitude limit will be subjected to a fine of R500,000, about $53,000.

Swaziland’s local folklore concerning witches holds that they use their brooms to spread their evil potions.

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Were the Salem witches actually guilty?

We’ve all been told that the Salem witch trials – in which twenty people were put to death – were the low point in the judicial history of North America. Now a former Maryland prosecutor has reexamined the famous trials to conclude that – while the condemned may not have possessed supernatural powers – an evaluation of the evidence presented in court does indicate that at least some were, indeed, guilty of witchcraft.

In his new book, William Cooke “separates the morality of criminalizing witchcraft from the job of the colonial courts.” Though he believes outlawing witchcraft is an infringement of freedom of religion, it should be the colonial legislative – not judicial – authorities that are the subject of contemporary ire.

In an interview with Parapolitical, Cooke also explains how the witch trials at Salem helped evolve the legal system we have today.

PARAPOLITICAL: One interesting case in the Salem trials involves Giles Corey who was pressed to death for refusing to enter a plea on a charge of being a warlock.

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2013 – Year of the Witch (Phantasmaphile Edition) – Interview with Pam Grossman

The story of how the work of Pam Grossman and her fantastic Phantasmaphile blog came to my attention quite predictably reeks of divine witchery. Despite being a practicing Occultist for 7 years, I somehow remained completely oblivious to the fact that one of the premier Occult book conventions in the world had been going down right beneath my nose in my hometown for four years. When I finally got hip, I remembered, then forgot, then remembered again at the last minute. Unfortunately, by that point I’d accidentally scheduled some family shit on the first day of the conference that I couldn’t easily duck out of. So I only caught day 2. It started at like 10 in the morning and I had to bus down, so I actually planned on skipping the first presentation as I’d stayed up late the night before. Through the course of that night, in some secret state of deranged hypnagogia, a voice came through the ether proclaiming: “they fucked up the order.”

I didn’t honestly know what this meant, but I woke up early the next morning at complete random. I was just lying there…

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Documentary: ‘The Power of the Witch’ (1971)

Check out this rare documentary on witchcraft. The late sixties and early seventies were, in my opinion, a boom time for paranormal-themed and generally spooky documentaries. Something about the slightly-warped sound and spotty visuals make these aged peeks into times past seem even more effective than modern fare like “Finding Bigfoot”

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Texas Town Concerned By Santa Muerte Statue’s Mysterious Appearance In Cemetery

I wouldn’t want to be on the receiving end of death spell that is this statue’s likely purpose. The San Benito News reports:

The identity of the owner of an oddly-placed statue of the Santisima Muerte in the middle of the San Benito Municipal Cemetery has become somewhat of a mystery. On Thursday, two local women expressed concern with the statue and called its presence “disrespectful” to the departed. City Manager Manuel Lara agreed that it should be removed if no one claims it.

The statue depicts Death atop a crushed pile of skulls, wielding a bronze globe in its left hand and a scythe in its right. It’s also accompanied by a bronze owl perched near the base and a tag tied to the scythe that displays a crowned Winged Death dangling a heart from a string.

Dr. Antonio N. Zavaleta, a renowned expert on the occult at the University of Texas at Brownsville, believes the statue’s purpose is malicious.

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Witchcraft, Spells, Curses, And Exorcisms Thriving In The Welsh Countryside, Reverend Claims

Are the picturesque towns of rural Wales a hotbed of the occult? The Telegraph on a scenario recalling the late nineties Sandra Bullock classic Practical Magic:

Witchcraft is thriving in the Welsh countryside, a church minister has said, as he described stumbling upon an increasing number of effigies, users of the evil eye and exorcisms. Rev. Felix Aubel claims occult practices in rural Wales have been increasing during the two decades he has been working in the area.

The minister spoke out after latest figures in the 2011 census has revealed 83 witches and 93 satanists are living in Wales. He said there was an “unusual connection” between Christianity and witchcraft in some chapel circles in Wales.

Rev. Aubel, who is the minister of five Congregational chapels in rural Carmarthenshire, said he has called out an exorcist after a witch placed a curse on one of his parishioners. He said: “This is not a joke and I would warn people not to get involved in the occult…I have been told that a coven of witches still meet locally.

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Witch Coven Members Deny Charges of Ritual Child Abuse

Two members of a Cornwall “white witch coven” have been accused of molesting young girls over the course of 30 years. Authorities say that the the two men, Peter Petrauske, 72, and Jack Kemp, 69, molested girls as young as three years-old during ceremonies in which the men wore robes and wielded daggers:

The Guardian:

Children were plied with alcohol before being made to undress in front of a crowd of men wearing robes, it was claimed.

The alleged victims, the youngest of whom aged three to five, were then abused by their tormentors before being given money and sweets to buy their silence, Truro crown court was told.

When Petrauske was arrested last year, detectives discovered daggers, candles, incense and lavender at his home, the court heard.

A case like this would have been a televangelist’s wet dream during the “Satanic Panic” of the eighties. What I find particularly odd about this story is the line about the detectives finding daggers, candles, incense and lavender in one of the suspect’s homes.… Read the rest

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Descendants Want Connecticut To Clear Names Of Women Executed For Witchcraft

More than three centuries later, Connecticut is the last state refusing to issue apology or posthumous pardons for those put to death during the time when laws based on the Bible held sway in America, Religion News Service writes:

At age 82, Bernice Mable Graham Telian doubts she’ll live long enough to see the name of her great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandmother and 10 others hanged in colonial Connecticut for witchcraft cleared.

Telian was researching her family tree when she discovered that her seventh grandmother, Mary Barnes of Farmington, Conn., was sent to the gallows at the site of the old State House in Hartford in 1663. “You won’t find Mary’s grave. She and all these people who were hanged were dumped in a hole. They wanted them to be forgotten,” said Telian, a retired university administrator.

Connecticut was executing suspected witches some 40 years before the infamous (and better known) trials in Salem, Mass.

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Inside Ghana’s Witch Camps

Imagine life in a remote town comprised entirely of “witches.” The BBC explains:

When misfortune hits a village, there is a tendency in some countries to suspect a “witch” of casting a spell. In Ghana, outspoken or eccentric women may also be accused of witchcraft – and forced to live out their days together in witch camps.

The camps are said to have come into existence more than 100 years ago, when village chiefs decided to establish isolated safe areas for the women. They survive by collecting firewood, selling little bags of peanuts or working in nearby farms.

“The camps are a dramatic manifestation of the status of women in Ghana,” says Professor Dzodzi Tsikata of the University of Ghana. “Older women become a target because they are no longer useful to society.”

Women who do not conform to society’s expectations also fall victim to the accusations of witchcraft, according to Lamnatu Adam of the women’s rights group Songtaba.

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EBay Bans Sale Of Magic, Spells, Curses, Witchcraft

Rumor has it that Etsy may follow suit. The question that comes to mind is, does this constitute religious discrimination? The other question that comes to mind is, who are the 20 people who bought a penis enlargement spell for 15 dollars on eBay? From eBay’s 2012 Fall Seller Update:

The following items are being added to the prohibited items list: advice; spells; curses; hexing; conjuring; magic; prayers; blessing services; magic potions; healing sessions.

Discontinued categories:

Metaphysical: Psychic, Paranormal > Readings
Metaphysical: Psychic, Paranormal > Spells, Potions
Metaphysical: Tarot Readings

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