Writing

I began writing these taxi stories a few years ago as a way of keeping in touch with my aging, published author mother back on the east coast; to let her know what’s been going on in my life.


Drinking and writing have always been joined at the hip. There is something oddly romantic about the drunk writer, brilliant, tortured, and misunderstood. Over the years, many a young hack without talent…











iTunes | Download (mp3) | RSS | iPhone App Ted Heistman is a frequent contributor to www.disinfo.com, covering topics including ecology, shamanism and alternative spirituality. @tedheistman. Video version of this podcast available:





From Divided Core: A writer friend of mine is serving some time in a Northern California jail and wrote an insightful letter which sheds some light on his experience behind bars.   With…


Today we use an ever-shrinking pool of shorter, simpler words as image-based communication eats up word-based language. Not long from now, we’ll be grunting and sending each other extremely complicated emoticons. Lifeboat writes:…




Author Thomas S. Roche has written a new zombie novel which incorporates WikiLeaks, conspiracy forums, and viral YouTube videos, studying the new wasteland where military violence intersects corporate disinformation. “I think WikiLeaks…


We can all agree that it’s O.K. for robots to take over unpleasant jobs — like cleaning up nuclear waste. But how could we have allowed them to commandeer one of the…


Monkeys At TypewritersThis is a thousand monkeys working at a thousand typewriters. Soon, they’ll have written the greatest novel known to mankind. [Reading one of the typewriters] It was the best of times, it was the blurst of times“?! You stupid monkey! [Monkey screeches] Oh, shut up. —Montgomery Burns

This Simpsons episode inspired programmer Jesse Anderson to see if it could actually work. As he explains:

Instead of having real monkeys typing on keyboards, I have virtual, computerized monkeys that output random gibberish. This is supposed to mimic a monkey randomly mashing the keys on a keyboard. The computer program I wrote compares that monkey’s gibberish to every work of Shakespeare to see if it actually matches a small portion of what Shakespeare wrote. If it does match, the portion of gibberish that matched Shakespeare is marked with green in the images below to show it was found by a monkey. The table below shows the exact number of characters and percentage the monkeys have found in Shakespeare. The parts of Shakespeare that have not been found are colored white. This process is repeated over and over until the monkeys have created every work of Shakespeare through random gibberish.