Tag Archives | Zimbabwe

Why do people seem to care more about the suffering of animals than humans?

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Alison Nastasi via Hopes&Fears:

Cecil—the 13-year-old male Southwest African lion named after Cecil Rhodes, founder of Rhodesia (known as Zimbabwe since 1980)—was a fixture at Hwange National Park, the country’s largest game reserve and the park’s biggest tourist attraction. He was accustomed to having his picture taken and reportedly trusting of humans. Scientists at Oxford University studied Cecil for an ongoing project about conservation. Last month, Cecil was shot with an arrow and, it is believed, lured out of the protected zone of the sanctuary.

Forty hours later, he was killed with a rifle, skinned, and decapitated. His headless body was missing the GPS tracking collar that he had been fitted with by Oxford’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU). Walter Palmer, an American dentist and big-game hunter, paid over $50,000 to stalk and kill Cecil. The despised Minnesotan has since closed down his practice after becoming the target of widespread backlash from celebrities, activists and the public (trending on Twitter under #CecilTheLion).

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Walter Palmer’s Options: Freedom, Prison in Zimbabwe, or Suicide?

walter palmer

Patrick Quinlan, author of Sexbot, runs down our favorite dentist’s options. Originally published in  Thee Optimist.

You don’t need me to tell you about Walter Palmer, do you?

In case you’ve been living at the bottom of a deep well, he’s the American dentist that paid over $50,000 to hunt and kill a beautiful, regal male lion named Cecil, who lived under protection in a Zimbabwean national park.

For our American audience, Zimbabwe is a country in Africa. Africa is a continent, kind of like Europe or Asia. There is no country simply called “Africa.”

And as an aside, the country known as “Mexico” is located in North America. Yes.

Geography is damn confusing. I know it.

So the hunt for Cecil the Lion took place at night, with a spotlight. Walter Palmer and his Zimbabwean guide tied a dead animal to their jeep. The smell of fresh meat lured Cecil off protected lands, at which point Palmer shot Cecil with a bow and arrow.… Read the rest

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UN Chooses Robert Mugabe As A ‘Leader for Tourism’

Robert MugabeDavid Usborne writes in the Independent:
Never mind that Robert Mugabe is under a travel ban for his cruel stewardship of Zimbabwe since independence. The United Nations, in its wisdom, has designated him a "leader for tourism" and chosen the Victoria Falls, shared with Zambia, as the venue for a holiday industry conference next year. At the UN World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), based in Madrid, the thinking seems to be: "If the old man can't visit us then we should visit him." The honour was made official when UNWTO head, Taleb Rifai, arrived at the Falls for a ceremony to name Zimbabwe and Zambia co-hosts of the 2013 conference ... Kumbi Muchemwa, a spokesman for the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) said: "I can't see any justification for the man being an 'ambassador'. An ambassador for what? The man has blood on his hands. Do they want tourists to see those bloody hands?"...
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Female ‘Sperm Hunter’ Gangs Prey On Men In Zimbabwe

women_2175454bA bizarre new crime wave. Via the Telegraph, in Zimbabwe’s underworld, gangs of women have been kidnapping and raping men traveling alone, for the purpose of harvesting their sperm:

Local media have reported victims of the highway prowlers being drugged, subdued at gun or knife point – even with a live snake in one case – given a sexual stimulant and forced into repeated sex before being dumped on the roadside.

The sperm’s exact use is not clear but is thought to be intended for “juju” or traditional rituals to bring luck – enhancing good fortune, boosting business or preventing a criminal from being detected. It is also not known why the semen is taken forcibly from strangers.

“It’s really an issue which is mind boggling,” said University of Zimbabwe sociologist Watch Ruparanganda, who believes it is a lucrative business. Ruparanganda said he was astonished to discover [the matter] seven years ago, while doing research for his doctoral thesis among Harare street youth.

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